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Scholarship Winners

Scholarship Winners
Joseph Ivie

Joseph Ivie

The 2011 Symantec Scholarship winner from Central Utah Science & Engineering Fair(CUSEF), held at BYU, was Joseph Ivie, a senior at Pleasant Grove High School. Joseph’s project, titled "The EyeMouse Mark II," used algorithms he invented to track eye movement with a webcam, and enabled computer users to control the mouse cursor with their eyes.
Zachary Kieda

Zachary Kieda

Zachary Kieda from West High School won the 2011 $10,000 scholarship from Symantec Corporation for his project, "Practical Chinese Character Recognition using Computational Algorithms," at the Salt Lake Valley Science and Engineering Fair. Zachary’s project developed a practical method of writing Chinese characters that are usually handwritten on a writing tablet. The project allows the user to enter written Chinese text substantially faster than using a Chinese keyboard and was designed to use a combination of fast, simple algorithms and a database that can be “trained” to the writing style of the individual user as well as groups of users.
Douglas Cannon

Douglas Cannon

Douglas Cannon, SUCCESS Academy Dixie, was awarded a $10,000 scholarship from Symantec Corporation for 2011 for his project, "Nutshell," at the Southern Utah University Science Fair. Jerry Stewart of Symantec Corporation said, “Doug took the time to design and implement a complete system, not just one piece of a system. You could say he took a holistic approach in his solution by exhibiting his skills in multiple areas of the computer science field. These included database design and implementation, user interface, communications strategies, as well as general programming know-how. These are traits commonly found in enterprise level application developers.”
Ian Sohl

Ian Sohl

Ian Sohl won the 2011 $10,000 scholarship from Symantec Corporation for his project, "N-Body Computational Analyses of the Aerocapture of Planetesimals Using Sympletic Algorithms" at the Weber State Ritchey Science and Engineering Fair of Utah. The purpose of Ian's project was to determine the possibility of a planetesimal entering into a stable orbit around a planet using aerocapture. Ian wrote an n-body symplectic integrator in Python. A symplectic algorithm is superior over a traditional Euler algorithm as it calculates velocity (and therefore acceleration) every half step, instead of on the step itself. Due to this, the actual body does not move nearly as far along its virtual path between the calculation of the last acceleration and velocity than it would with an Euler algorithm. Although this impacts performance somewhat, overall it is negligible. To visualize the data, Ian used a 3rd party Python library, called VPython. Due to the graphics intensive nature of the visual representation, Ian removed the majority of the graphics out of the program, and instead built a separate program to display pickled (object serialized) data from the simulations.
Brian Wernick & Jens Trauntvein

Brian Wernick & Jens Trauntvein

Brian Wernick and Jens Trauntvein were awarded the 2009 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Richey Science Fair (Weber State University), for their project “LabLock.” Brian and Jens collaborated to create a production quality application to maintain the desktop security of the computers in their high school computer lab. The application was designed to prevent users from changing the default desktop configuration. The project was started in 2008 and was designed according to project requirements defined by the school faculty. Brian and Jens experienced the full product development cycle by developing to defined specifications, researching software architecture to find hidden APIs, beta testing, responding to bugs uncovered by users, increasing user-friendliness and multiple product release cycles. Brian and Jens are investigating the commercial viability of their program and will continue the development of the product for the benefit of their school.
Matt Vitelli

Matt Vitelli

Matt Vitelli was awarded the 2009 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Salt Lake Science and Engineering Fair (University of Utah), for his project “Hybrid Light Rendering.” He wrote the project using at least 3 different computer languages: C++, C#, and a graphics language. He invented his own algorithm for displaying multiple light sources in 3D subjects. His algorithm was a hybrid of two of the most common algorithms today. The advantage of his algorithm is that it has the benefit of newer algorithms without requiring the expensive 3D rendering hardware to run it.
Bridger Maxwell

Bridger Maxwell

Bridger Maxwell was awarded the 2009 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Central Utah Science and Engineering Fair (Brigham Young University) for his project “Creating a Computer System for Simulation-Based Education.” This project is a server and multi-client system programming environment that they are using at the Space Center for running simulated space missions. It was written in x-code using the Apple Cocoa programming environment. It includes templates that allow other schools to quickly install and customize the system for their specific configurations and missions.
Forrest Tait

Forrest Tait

Forrest Tait was awarded the 2009 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Southern Utah Science and Engineering Fair (Southern Utah University), for his project “Latin Lingo.” The problem he was trying to solve was that in his Latin class he found reviewing Latin grammatical constructs to be very tedious. He wanted to find a better way to drill himself on his Latin grammar. He wrote two Win32 applications in assembly language. The first program was a speed drill where the user identified the correct suffixes to add to words to create the correct grammatical construct. The second program was a speed drill where the user identified the correct grammatical construct in a group of phrases presented. Paul Madden, who is the development manager for the Driver Team at Symantec, said,” That is some of the best assembler code I have ever seen.”
Matthew Turnblom

Matthew Turnblom

Matthew Turnblom, a high school senior from the DaVinci Academy of Science and the Arts, was awarded the 2008 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Richey Science Fair (Weber State University), for his project “Security Without Chaos.” For his project, Matt programmed three security encryption algorithms without random number generators and evaluated the effectiveness of each. He succeeded in determining which of the three was the most secure. Matt will continue to extend the scope of his project following the science fair by including the encryption of binary code. He intends to use the scholarship to pursue a computer science related degree at Brigham Young University.
Trevor Boardman

Trevor Boardman

Trevor Boardman, a sophomore from Delta attending Delta High School, was awarded the 2008 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Southern Utah Science and Engineering Fair (Southern Utah University) for his project “Predictive Modeling and Validation of Alternative Energy Resource Potential”. In this project Trevor used a solar cell and an anemometer to gather basic solar and wind data. He then created a program to predict based on his data how much energy you could obtain if you scaled up the size of your solar cells and incorporated wind generators. He also included in his program day of year, latitude and longitude.
Matt Wright

Matt Wright

Matt Wright, a senior at Olympus High School in Salt Lake City, was awarded the 2008 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Salt Lake Science and Engineering Fair (University of Utah). For his projects he wrote a software package that allowed a user to highlight areas in individual frames of a video and then apply one of four lighting effects to the collection of highlighted areas. The software was written in Java. The software package, Rebas Light, is available for download at the URL http://rebaslight.com for $20.00. There are commercial video effects packages that have this feature, but Matt chose this one to fit his project’s budget.
Samuel White

Samuel White

Samuel White, a junior at Riverton High School, was awarded the 2008 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Central Utah Science and Engineering Fair (Brigham Young University) for his project “Artificial Intelligence: Testing Strategy through Computer Simulation”. Samuel’s project included a real-time strategy war game that he used to test various strategies against each other. He wrote the project himself beginning during Christmas break and continuing through January and February. Samuel began programming in HTML in the 6th grade, and soon taught himself Java Script and PHP. His current project is written in Java. He is mostly a self-taught programmer using books from the library and online sources. He got interested in the science fair when he heard about the Symantec Software Scholarship and thought he would give it a try. He got the idea for the game from playing Risk with his brothers. He hopes to improve his game by adding alliances and additional units, including networking capabilities, and enhancing the graphics.
Kelsee Hart

Kelsee Hart

Kelsee Hart of T.H. Bell Junior High School Freshman, and Winner of the 2007 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Richey Science Fair (Weber State University), was awarded a 2007 Symantec Software Scholarship for her project, "Light Intensity: Can robots really see?”. Using a robot kit, Kelsee built a robot that included multiple sensory inputs: sound, sight and touch. She then programmed the robot’s software to discern the difference between a red and a blue ball, and then to correctly choose the red ball. Upon command, the robot would pick up a ball and analyze it. If it was not the desired red ball, the robot would put the ball back down. Once the correct ball was discovered, the robot would hold onto the ball until the verbal command was given to release it.
Nick Terry

Nick Terry

Nick Terry was awarded the 2007 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Salt Lake Science and Engineering Fair (University of Utah). His project was a goal-seeking program in a maze, where one to sixteen automatons searched for a target within the maze. The automatons each ran on separate computers which were connected by a peer-to-peer network. Nick set up a broadcast system where packets were sent to all computers but where each computer could extract its own content or broadcast content from the packets. He had code to handle temporary loss of communication from nodes and used a game development environment to create 3D-type rock walls and a floor in the maze.
Ben Arnold

Ben Arnold

Ben Arnold, a high school senior, was awarded the 2007 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Brigham Young University Science Fair. Ben was one of fifteen candidates at the Brigham Young University Science Fair that met the Symantec Software Scholarship criteria. Ben entered the Computer Science category with a software program that he wrote in the C programming language. His program runs diagnostics on a traffic sensing and mentoring system. His program runs its diagnostics using real traffic monitoring sensors, but also runs them through emulated traffic sensors. His program is cross compiled on a personal computer, but it runs on a small, single board computer (SBC) in the traffic monitoring subsystem. Data output is displayed through a system of light emitting diodes (LEDs) on the front of the SBC. This software is currently being used to resolve problems in working traffic systems.
Tyson Boardman

Tyson Boardman

Tyson Boardman, a high school senior, was awarded the 2007 Symantec Software Scholarship at the Southern Utah University Science Fair. Tyson was one of four candidates at the Southern Utah University Science Fair that met the criteria for the scholarship. He entered the category Engineering: Electrical and Me with his project titled, "Semi-Autonomous UAV Control Using Ultrasonic Multilateration". Tyson wrote a software program that determines the position of a UAV within 1cm, calculated in 3 dimensional space. He used sonar and timings to determine the position.