Configuring ServiceDesk

Article:HOWTO82048  |  Created: 2012-11-05  |  Updated: 2013-04-18  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/HOWTO82048
Article Type
How To


Subject


Configuring ServiceDesk

Before you use ServiceDesk in your production environment, you must configure ServiceDesk to meet your needs. The configuration tasks are performed in the Process Manager portal and require administrator permissions.

See About configuring ServiceDesk.

You may want to perform some of these tasks again after your initial ServiceDesk configuration.

Before you begin to configure ServiceDesk, verify that it is installed and that you have performed the required setup steps.

See Before you configure ServiceDesk.

After you configure ServiceDesk, you may want to perform some additional configurations before you introduce ServiceDesk into your production environment.

See Additional ServiceDesk configurations.

If you migrated from a previous version of ServiceDesk or from Helpdesk Solution 6.x, you may want to migrate data to ServiceDesk 7.5.

See About migrating data to ServiceDesk 7.5.

Depending on your needs, you may want to perform some advanced customizations before you introduce ServiceDesk into your production environment.

See Advanced ServiceDesk customizations.

Table: ServiceDesk configuration tasks

Action

Description

Import users and groups from Active Directory, verify, and assign permissions.

If you use Active Directory authentication for ServiceDesk, you can set up Active Directory server connections and Active Directory sync profiles. Once you add the sync profiles, you can import the users and groups from Active Directory into ServiceDesk.

See Configuring Active Directory sync profiles.

Review the imported information to verify its accuracy, edit it if necessary, and assign permissions.

See Copying permissions between groups.

See Adding or removing permissions for groups.

Add users, groups, and organizational units, and assign permissions.

If you use native authentication for ServiceDesk, you must add the users in the Process Manager portal. ServiceDesk contains predefined groups and permissions, which you can use or modify. Assign the new users to the appropriate groups.

See Creating a new user.

See Creating a group.

See Creating an organizational unit.

See Adding or removing permissions for groups.

See Copying permissions between groups.

See Default ServiceDesk user groups.

Configure the Process Manager portal master settings.

The Process Manager portal master settings determine the behavior of ServiceDesk and the portal.

You can use the default settings or you can edit them as necessary. Symantec recommends that you review and become familiar with the master settings before you edit them.

See About the Process Manager portal master settings.

See Editing the Process Manager portal master settings.

Customize the appearance of the Process Manager portal.

You can customize the Process Manager portal in the following ways:

Configure your business hours and holidays.

Business hours are the hours during which your business is commonly conducted. ServiceDesk provides a set of default business hours.

The default business hours are Monday thru Friday, 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. You can modify the default business hours or add your own business hours configurations.

See Configuring business hours.

Configure Service Level Agreement (SLA) levels, escalations, and milestones.

A Service Level Agreement (SLA) is a contract between an organization and its service provider, which sets the expectations and requirements for service delivery. The SLA includes the allowable time frame for the service delivery.

Incident Management provides default Service Level Agreement levels, escalations, and milestones. You can use the default settings or you can configure SLA levels, escalations, and milestones to meet your needs.

See Creating and Editing Service Level Agreements (SLAs).

Configure incident categories and the data hierarchy.

Categories are used to classify ServiceDesk incidents. ServiceDesk contains predefined incident categories, which you can use immediately or edit to meet your organization's requirements. If you migrated incidents or categories from Helpdesk Solution, those categories are added to the Process Manager portal for use in future incidents.

Review the existing categories and edit or add to them if necessary.

See About Incident Management classifications and the data hierarchy.

See Default categories for incidents and default classifications for problems.

Verify or edit the incident types.

During incident submittal, support technicians can specify an incident type to identify the general nature of the incident. The incident type can be modified whenever an incident is worked.

If an incident type has not been provided, the support technician must provide an incident type when an incident is resolved.

ServiceDesk contains a set of predefined incident types that are ready to use. Review them to ensure that they meet your needs. If necessary, you can create or delete incident types.

See About incident types.

See Creating and deleting incident types.

Verify or edit the default impact, urgency, and priority values.

During incident entry, the submitter specifies the incident's impact and urgency. Support technicians can also specify the priority. When a user submits an incident, the priority level is assigned based on the impact and the urgency that the user specified.

See About the incident priority.

ServiceDesk contains default values for the impact, urgency, and priority settings. You can change the available impact and urgency values and the priority that is assigned to the combination of the two values.

Create Incident Management service queues

The Incident Management process lets you route incidents to service queues. Before you can configure rules to route incidents, you must first create your service queues. These service queues are then available when you create your routing rules to route incoming incidents or to reassign an incident.

Service queues consist of a group or multiple groups that you associate with it. You can change users and group without reconfiguring your routing rules. You can add or remove the users that are in the group that you associate with the service queue. You can add or remove the groups that are associated with the service queue.

See Creating incident service queues.

Configure your Data Mapping Routing Tables

The Incident Management process lets you configure routing tables so that you can route incidents by specific classifications or by specific locations.

Before you can configure rules to route incidents by specific classifications or locations, you must first configure the Routing Tables.

These routing tables can then be used when you create your routing rules to route your incidents.

See About configuring Data Mapping Routing Tables.

Create email templates for Incident Management.

Email notifications for Incident Management are handled through the Process Automation rules.

Before you can configure rules to send out email notifications, you must first create your email templates for those notifications.

These templates are then available when you create your email notification rules and select the Send Email action.

See Creating email templates for Incident Management.

Configure the Incident Management Process Automation rules.

Rules determine which incidents are routed to which queues when new ServiceDesk incidents are submitted. Rules determine when email notifications are sent. Rules determine what happens when incident SLAs are late.

This step requires time for testing and configuration. To set up automation rules properly, it's important to understand the underlying process. The actions available in the rule builder give you the ability to change information about the ticket while the ticket executes.

See Incident Management Process Automation rules components.

Verify or edit the incident close codes.

When an incident is closed, the support technician must provide a close code to indicate the nature of the resolution.

ServiceDesk contains a set of predefined close codes that are ready to use. Review them to ensure that they meet your needs. If necessary, you can delete or add to the default close codes.

See About incident close codes.

See Adding and deleting incident close codes.

Create change team groups for Change Management.

In the Change Management process, a change team is a group of people who can assess, plan, authorize, schedule, implement, and test a change request. The change team includes the change advisory board (CAB). The members of the CAB advise the change manager in the assessment, planning, and authorization of changes.

During the initial approval phase of the Change Management process, the change manager selects the members of the change team. You can create predefined change team groups to facilitate the team selection.

See Configuring Change Management.

Create email templates for Change Management.

Email notifications for Change Management are handled through the Process Automation rules.

Before you can configure rules to send out email notifications, you must first create your email templates for those notifications.

These templates are then available when you create your email notification rules and select the Send Email action.

See Creating email templates for Change Management.

Configure the Change Management Process Automation rules.

This step requires time for testing and configuration. To set up automation rules properly, it's important to understand the underlying process.

The actions available in the rule builder give you the ability to change information about the ticket while the ticket executes.

See Configuring Change Management.

(Optional) Make the ServiceDesk documentation available to your users.

Each organization has specific requirements for providing documentation to their process workers and the users of the Process Manager portal. Therefore, the ServiceDesk documentation is not installed with ServiceDesk. Symantec recommends that you download these guides and make them available to your users as needed.

See Making the ServiceDesk documentation available to users.

(Optional) Add a MIME type for remote control through RDP

When a process worker works a task that is associated with an equipment configuration item (CI), the worker can access the Remote Control (Via RDP) link. The link runs a tool, which generates and downloads an RDP file that contains the configuration item's IP address. The worker can use the RDP file to open a Remote Desktop Connection to the computer that the CI represents.

This functionality requires that IIS (Internet Information Services) contains a MIME type for RDP. If you plan to use the remote control tool, you must add the new MIME type. In Internet Information Services Manager, you can edit the local computer's Properties and add a new MIME type. In the new MIME type, both the extension and MIME type are .rdp.

After you add the new MIME type, you must restart IIS for the change to take effect.


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