How to handle a corrupted image file

Article:TECH107196  |  Created: 2000-01-16  |  Updated: 2011-08-31  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH107196
Article Type
Technical Solution

Product(s)

Environment

Issue



Norton Ghost 2003 or Ghost Solution Suite 1.0 or above, displays a message indicating that the image file is damaged or corrupted, or a Technical Support agent or Knowledge Base document has indicated this. You need to know how to get the image file to work.

 


Solution



When the image file is corrupted, it cannot be repaired. Ghost does not include any features for repairing corrupted image files. You must create a new image file instead.

In some cases, what appears to be a corrupted image file is actually corruption on the source drive (the drive that you created an image of). Before creating a new image file, determine whether the corruption is actually in the image file or whether the corruption is on the source drive. If the corruption is on the source drive, repair the source drive before creating a new image file.

To determine whether the image file is corrupted, see the document How to verify the integrity of an image file.

Determining whether there is corruption on the source drive
Because Ghost does not normally detect corruption on the source drive while Ghost is creating an image file, check the source drive with a disk utility, such as Norton Utilities' Norton Disk Doctor or Microsoft's CheckDisk (CHKDSK), before creating an image file.

When you suspect problems with the image file and the Ghost integrity check did not find any problems, use a disk utility to find and repair problems on the source disk. If the disk utility does not find problems in the disk structure or file system, run the utility to find and repair surface problems (in Norton Disk Doctor, this is called the Surface Test) such as corrupt disk sectors. Once the disk problems have been repaired, create a new image file.


    Note: Because disk utilities will sometimes repair minor corruption problems without reporting the problems, creating a new image file even when no problems are reported by the disk utility sometimes resolves the image file problem.


When the corruption recurs
Disk utility programs repair disk corruption but cannot repair the cause of the initial corruption. If you created a new image file after running a disk utility to repair problems on the source drive and the image file problem still occurs, look for the following causes:

  • Using the initial release of Norton Ghost 2003 over a USB 2.0 connection
    In limited circumstances, using Norton Ghost 2003 to create an image file and save that file directly to an external storage device over a USB 2.0 connection can corrupt the image file. This problem was resolved in the first update to Norton Ghost 2003. See the document Updates to Norton Ghost 2003.
  • Wrong drivers for the Network Interface Card (NIC) or an improperly configured NIC
    When creating or restoring an image over a network with Ghost Multicast or Ghost Enterprise Console, using a NIC driver that was not designed for your NIC can cause data corruption during the file creation process. If you created your Multicast Client boot disk manually, recreate the boot disk using Ghost's Boot Wizard feature (in Ghost 6.04 and earlier, this is called Multicast Assist). Multicast Assist provides driver files for many types of NIC's.
     
  • Running Norton Ghost 2002 or earlier from within Windows (in a DOS environment within Windows)
    In early Ghost versions, Symantec recommends that you create and restore image files at a client computer by running the Ghost executable file (Ghost.exe, GhostPE.exe, or GhostWrks.exe) at the client computer from DOS--not from a DOS window within Windows. Running the Ghost executable within Windows to create and restore image files can corrupt the image file due to open files, existing memory interference, or corruption not related to Ghost. For more information, see the document How to launch Ghost.
     
  • Physical defects or damage on the source disk or computer, such as faulty cabling
    When creating or restoring an image over a network with Ghost Multicast or Ghost Enterprise Console or over a NetBIOS connection, check for damage to the NIC or problems with the cables between the two computers. When creating or restoring an image locally, check for damage to the hard disk controller or the cables connecting the hard disk to the storage media, such as the second hard disk or a Jaz or Zip drive.


Recovering important files
If there are files in the image that you must recover, try opening the image file with Ghost Explorer to extract the files needed.

If you cannot extract the files, run Ghost Explorer from the command line with the switches -IGNOREINDEX and -CORRUPT.

  • Using -IGNOREINDEX
    Ghost includes an index file within each image file, and uses the index to find the other files that are in the image file. The -IGNOREINDEX switch opens Ghost Explorer and tells Ghost Explorer to find the files by reading directly from the image file, rather than from the index file.

    To use the switch, run GhostExp.exe from a DOS command line:

    "C:\Program Files\Symantec\Ghost\Ghostexp.exe" -ignoreindex

    You may need to change the path to match the path on your computer.
     
  • Using -CORRUPT
    When Ghost Explorer encounters file corruption in an image file, it normally reports an error and stops. When you use the -corrupt switch, Ghost Explorer ignores the corrupt area of the file and attempts to find the next file in the image.

    To use the switch, run GhostExp.exe from a DOS command line:

    "C:\Program Files\Symantec\Ghost\Ghostexp.exe" -corrupt
     

Recovering overwritten drives
See the document Recovering a drive after writing over it with Ghost.

Preventing corruption while managing image files
To reduce the possibility of corruption while managing image files, use the DOS COPY command with the /V switch, which enables verification, instead of dragging and dropping with the Windows Explorer. For example, type:

COPY /V C:\IMAGE.GHO D:\IMAGE.GHO





 



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Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH107196


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