Disaster Recovery of a remote Windows 2000 or 2003 computer (includes non-authoritative restore of Active Directory for a domain controller)

Article:TECH10837  |  Created: 2010-01-19  |  Updated: 2014-02-06  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH10837
Article Type
Technical Solution

Product(s)

Subject

Issue



Disaster Recovery of a remote Windows 2000 or 2003 computer (includes non-authoritative restore of Active Directory for a domain controller)


Solution



Note:  If the system is protected by Backup Exec (tm) for Windows Servers Intelligent Disaster Recovery (IDR), see "Backup Exec for Windows Servers - Intelligent Disaster Recovery Option" in the Backup Exec Administrator's Guide for information on automated disaster recovery. The procedure described in the following section allows a manual recovery of a computer not protected by IDR.

Disaster recovery can be performed on a remote computer attached to the media server. This procedure will restore the remote computer's operating system to its pre-disaster state and will restore all data files, except those protected by one of the Backup Exec agents. If any of the data on the remote server is protected by Backup Exec database agents, read "Additional Backup Exec Options" in the Backup Exec Administrator's Guide.

The following items are required:
  • A current full backup of the computer to be recovered and any subsequent incremental/differential backups
  • The Windows 2000 or 2003 installation media and service packs for Windows 2003 only.
Note:  Always log on to Windows using the administrator account or its equivalent during this procedure.

To recover a remote Windows 2000 or 2003 computer:
 
At the remote computer:
 
1.  Install Windows.
  • This basic Windows installation is necessary to provide Backup Exec with a target to which it can restore the system. The computer name, Windows directory and the file system (NTFS) must be the same as the previous Windows installation. This basic installation will later be overwritten by the backed up version, which will restore the system configuration, application settings, and security settings.
  • If the machine is being recovered from hard disk failure, use Windows setup to partition and format the new disk during installation. Format the partitions with the same file system as before the failure.
  • If the system was upgraded from Server 2000 as evidenced by a winnt folder with no windows folder in the restore selections, then this new OS must match.  It must be upgraded from server 2000 prior to the restore attempt.  
  • For Windows 2003 only - apply service packs to the same level as before the disaster
  • Do not join a domain, leave the computer in a workgroup
  • Do not install Active Directory 
  • Note: If the server was previously joined to a domain, or was a DC, verify the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) is shown.  To up the FQDN: Logon to the remote server to be restored, right click "My Computer" and select the Computer Name tab > Change > More > Primary DNS suffix of this computer and add the FQDN in the DNS suffix.
 
2.  Install the Backup Exec Remote Agent to the remote computer (see "Installing the Backup Exec Remote Agent for Windows Servers" in the Backup Exec Administrator's Guide)
 
 

NOTE: This typically represents a few hours of work up to this point.  If anything is misconfigured on the new OS, or if the restore fails for any reason, the work done thus far may be lost.  It is highly suggested to take a Symantec System Recovery(SSR) backup of your clean operating system now.  This can be done using SSR in trial mode and so does not require a key.  If the restore goes bad, the clean OS can be recovered by booting from the Symantec System Recovery Disk (SRD) 

 
 
Optional for DC only: Restart the system into Directory Service Restore Mode (DSRM)
 
 
At the media server:

3.  Start Backup Exec for Windows Servers
 
4.  From the Backup Selections tab, locate the remote computer that is being restored and its administrative shares.
 
Double-click an administrative share and enter the user credentials.
 
Example: <Computer Name>\Administrator
 
This allows the system to authenticate the credentials, and creates a connection between the local and remote computers.
 

5. From the Devices tab, Inventory the media containing the latest full backup of the computer to be recovered
 
6. Catalog the media containing the latest full backup of the computer to be recovered. If the subsequent differential/incremental backups are on separate media, catalog those also.
 
7.  Click Restore on the toolbar  
 
* Verify that the server was indeed booting from the 'c:\windows' directory and not 'c:\winnt'  If all you see is c:\winnt in your catalogs, then this is how the new server must be configured.   
 
8.  From the Restore Selections tab, select all sets from the full and incremental backups that contain logical drives on the hard disk. If differential backup sets are to be restored, select only the last differential set. Make sure to include System State as part of the restore selections.
 
9.  From the General tab, select the following options:
  • Restore security
  • Preserve tree
10. From the General tab, select Restore over existing files
 
11. Click Run Now unless the computer being restored is the only domain controller in the domain or if the entire domain is being rebuilt and this is the first domain controller. Otherwise, perform the following additional steps:
  • From the Advanced tab, select Mark this server as the primary arbitrator for replication when restoring folders managed by the File Replication Service, or when restoring SYSVOL in System State
  • Click Run Now to start the restore
  • Reboot the remote computer 
The computer's operating system is now restored to its pre-disaster state. All data files have been restored, except those protected by Backup Exec database agents. 

 




Legacy ID



236286


Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH10837


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