How does the automated master restore feature work with Backup Exec

Article:TECH48576  |  Created: 2006-01-25  |  Updated: 2013-07-10  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH48576
Article Type
Technical Solution



Issue



How does the automated master restore feature work with Backup Exec.


Solution



Backup Exec provides a quicker method for restoring SQL rather than running the Rebuild Master utility or reinstalling SQL to restart SQL. Using Backup Exec, the corrupted or missing databases can be replaced with copies of the master and model databases that Backup Exec automatically creates and updates whenever backups of those databases are run. After SQL is running again, restore the latest copy of the master database using Backup Exec's Automate master database restore option, and then restore any other databases, if needed.

If using SQL 2000 and 2005:


Copies of the master and model databases are automatically created by Backup Exec whenever backing up the master and model databases. Backup Exec places these copies in the same directory that the databases are in, where they must remain in order to be updated.

In a default installation of SQL 2000 or 2005, the databases are in:
C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL\Data\*.*.

In a named instance of SQL 2000 or 2005, the databases are in:
C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL$Instance_Name\Data\*.*

The copies of the master and model databases are named:
 

  • Master$4idr
  • Mastlog$4idr
  • Model$4idr
  • Modellog$4idr


    Whenever backing up the system drive that contains a SQL instance, copies of the master and model databases are backed up. Backing up the system drive that SQL is on also backs up all the executables and registry settings needed for SQL to run.

     
  • Back up the master database whenever any changes are made to SQL.
  • Keep records of any service packs that have been installed.
  • Be prepared to recover the entire server, not just SQL

     
  • Back up both system and user databases and transaction logs regularly.
  • Back up the system drive that contains SQL.
  • Backing up the system drive that SQL is on also backs up all the executables and registry settings needed for SQL to run.
     
  • Back up the master database whenever any changes are made to SQL.
  • Keep records of any service packs that have been installed.
  • Make sure you are prepared to recover the entire server, not just SQL.

    To perform a recovery:

     
  • The SQL database or filegroup backups, and differential and log backups.
  • An Administrator logon account (or an Administrator equivalent) during the recovery.
  • The latest backup of the SQL directory (\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL), and the and System State are good to have but not needed to restore the databases.


    If the Intelligent Disaster Recovery (IDR) option was purchased, then during an IDR recovery of drive C, it will automatically replace the damaged databases with the copies of the master and model databases. Afterward, restart SQL, and restore the latest master database backup and any other databases that are necessary.

    NOTE:  

     
  • For the Intelligent Disaster Recovery Option to work with SQL 2000, copies are made of the master and model databases. Copies are only made when non-AOFO backups of master and model are run. If using AOFO for SQL backups, make at least one backup of the master and model databases without using AOFO.
  • If SQL 2000 is upgraded, refresh the copies with another non-AOFO backup.



Legacy ID



284437


Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH48576


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