Why do backups and restores use the RJ45 connection to send and receive communication during jobs instead of using the Fiber Channel card

Article:TECH68820  |  Created: 2009-01-20  |  Updated: 2009-01-20  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH68820
Article Type
Technical Solution

Product(s)

Environment

Issue



Why do backups and restores use the RJ45 connection to send and receive communication during jobs instead of using the Fiber Channel card

Solution



When communicating from server to server in any given network scenario, the method of locating the server to which the first server needs to talk to, a query will be made to a server on the network that assumes the role of DNS (Domain Name Service).  This server will then translate the name of the server that has been queried into an IP address.  This is returned to the requesting server as the location of the server that was queried.  The requesting server then uses that IP address to directly query the remote server that it is requesting to talk to.  This process is standard for any TCP / IP network topology.

There are alternate types of network media that can be used to reach servers on a network.  The table below describes a list of the possible connections.

Table 1
 
StandardCable TypeMaximum LengthConnector TypeIEEE Standard
10Base2Thin Coaxial185 MetersBNC803.2a
10 / 100 / 1000 BaseTCat 3, 4, 5, 5E Twisted Pair100 MetersRJ-45803.2a
10BaseFL / FDDIFiber Optic / Twisted Pair (CDDI)2000 MetersSC / ST803.2a / ANSI FDDI


This is only a short list of the type of network mediums available.  The most common is RJ-45 and Fiber connector types.

When Backup Exec attempts to backup a server, this occurs across the medium that the network DNS says is the way to reach the remote server.  The following steps are used to establish a connection to the source server selected for backup.

1.  Backup Exec makes a query to the DNS to resolve the IP address for the server selected for backup
2.  The DNS server returns the IP address
3.  Backup Exec opens a connection to the IP address on the NDMP port (default is 10000)
4.  Backup Exec establishes a port to be used for data transmission to and from the Media server and Remote server
5.  Backup begins

This is explained in the diagram listed below in Figure 1

Figure 1
 

In order to get a backup to occur across a fiber connection, there are 2 ways to get this to happen.  The options are listed below.

Option A


Required for this option
  • Multiple licenses for Backup Exec Media Servers and all agent options
  • License for SAN Share Storage Option for Backup Exec on all Media Servers
  • Fiber channel card
  • Fiber switch configured to allow all server to see the fiber attached device to be used as the backup destination

1.  Setup an installation of Backup Exec on every server that will need to be backed up including all licenses for each server.
2.  Configure the SAN Shared Storage Option for Backup Exec so that the fiber device(s) can be used by all installations of Backup Exec
3.  Make sure that Backup Exec can see the device on the fiber in DEVICES tab that you want to write the backup to.
4.  Create a backup job on each of those server to backup only itself.
5.  Make sure that the jobs are pointing to the device on the fiber.
6.  Run the backups

This is explained in the diagram listed below in Figure 2

Figure 2
 

Option B


Required for this option
  • A single license for Backup Exec Media Server with the agent licenses.
  • The Backup Exec Remote Agent installed on the remote servers to be backed up.
  • Fiber channel card that supports IP address binding.
  • Fiber channel switch.

1.  Install a fiber channel card that supports the assignment of an IP address to itself.
2.  Make sure that there are no zoning restrictions that prevent one server from communicating to another.
3.  Configure the DNS to use the IP address on the fiber instead of the RJ-45 network medium.
4.  Confirm that the remote server(s) is seen on the network using the fiber channel card IP address.
5.  Create a backup job on the Media server to backup the remote servers.
6.  Make sure that the jobs are pointing to the device on the fiber.
7.  Run the backups.

This is explained in the diagram listed below in Figure 3

Figure 3
 

The above options are the only way to successfully perform a backup across fiber instead of a RJ-45 connection.  For instructions on how to configure the fiber channel cards to use an IP address, contact the manufacturer of the fiber channel card for assistance.



Legacy ID



321158


Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH68820


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