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Big Data Decisions Ahead: Government-Sponsored Town Hall Meeting for eDiscovery Industry Coincides With Federal Agency Deadline

Created: 29 Feb 2012 • 2 comments
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Update For Report Submission By Agencies

We are fast approaching the March 27, 2012 deadline for federal agencies to submit their reports to the Office of Management and Budget and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to comply with the Presidential Mandate on records management. We are only at the inception, as we look to a very exciting public town hall meeting in Washington, D.C. - also scheduled for March 27, 2012. This meeting is primarily focused on gathering input from the public sector community, the vendor/IT community, and members of the public at large. Ultimately, NARA will issue a directive that will outline a centralized approach for the federal government for managing records and eDiscovery.

Agencies have been tight lipped about how far along they are in the process of evaluating their workflows and tools for managing their information (both electronic and paper). There is, however, some empirical data from an InformationWeek Survey conducted last year that takes the temperature on where the top IT professionals within the government have their sights set, and the Presidential Mandate should bring some of these concerns to the forefront of the reports. For example, the #1 business driver for migrating to the cloud - cited by 62% of respondents - was cost, while 77% of respondents said their biggest concern was security. Nonetheless, 46% were still highly likely to migrate to a private cloud.

Additionally, as part of the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative, agencies are looking to eliminate 800 data centers. While the cost savings are clear, from an information governance viewpoint, it’s hard not to ask what the government plans to do with all of those records?  Clearly, this shift, should it happen, will force the government into a more service-based management approach, as opposed to the traditional asset-based management approach. Some agencies have already migrated to the cloud. This is squarely in line with the Opex over Capex approach emerging for efficiency and cost savings.

Political Climate Unknown

Another major concern that will affect any decisions or policy implementation within the government is, not surprisingly, politics. Luckily, regardless of political party affiliation, it seems to be broadly agreed that the combination of IT spend in Washington, D.C. and the government’s slow move to properly manage electronic records is a problem. Two of the many examples of the problem are manifested in the inability to issue effective litigation holds or respond to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests in a timely and complete manner. Even still, the political agenda of the Republican party may affect the prioritization of the Democratic President’s mandate and efforts could be derailed with a potential change in administration.

Given the election year and the heavy analysis required to produce the report, there is a sentiment in Washington that all of this work may be for naught if the appropriate resources cannot be secured then allocated to effectuate the recommendations. The reality is that data is growing at an unprecedented rate, and the need for the intelligent management of information is no longer deniable. The long term effects of putting this overhaul on the back burner could be disastrous. The government needs a modular plan and a solid budget to address the problem now, as they are already behind.

VanRoekel’s Information Governance

One issue that will likely not be agreed upon between Democrats and Republicans to accomplish the mandate is the almighty budget, and the technology the government must purchase in order to accomplish the necessary technological changes are going to cost a pretty penny.  Steven VanRoekel, the Federal CIO, stated upon the release of the FY 2013 $78.8 billion dollar IT budget:

“We are also making cyber security a cross-agency, cross-government priority goal this year. We have done a good job in ramping up on cyber capabilities agency-by-agency, and as we come together around this goal, we will hold the whole of government accountable for cyber capabilities and examine threats in a holistic way.”

His quote indicates the priority from the top down of evaluating IT holistically, which dovetails nicely with the presidential mandate since security and records management are only two parts of the entire information governance picture. Each agency still has their own work cut out for them across the EDRM. One of the most pressing issues in the upcoming reports will be what each agency decides to bring in-house or to continue outsourcing. This decision will in part depend on whether the inefficiencies identified lead agencies to conclude that they can perform those functions for less money and more efficiently than their contractors.  In evaluating their present capabilities, each agency will need to look at what workflows and technologies they currently have deployed across divisions, what they presently outsource,  and what the marketplace potentially offers them today to address their challenges.

The reason this question is central is because it begs an all-important question about information governance itself.  Information governance inherently implies that an organization or government control most or all aspects of the EDRM model in order to derive the benefits of security, storage, records management and eDiscovery capabilities. Presently, the government is outsourcing many of their litigation services to third party companies that have essentially become de facto government agencies.  This is partly due to scalability issues, and partly because the resources and technologies that are deployed in-house within these agencies are inadequate to properly execute a robust information governance plan.

Conclusion

The ideal scenario for each government agency to comply with the mandate would be that they deploy automated classification for their records management, archiving with expiration appropriately implemented for more than just email, and finally, some level of eDiscovery capability in order to conduct early case assessment and easily produce data for FOIA.  The level of early case assessment needed by each agency will vary, but the general idea would be that before contacting a third party to conduct data collection, the scope of an investigation or matter would be able to be determined in-house.  All things considered, the question remains if the Obama administration will foot this bill or if we will have to wait for a bigger price tag later down the road.  Either way, the government will have to come up to speed and make these changes eventually and the town hall meeting should be an accurate thermometer on where the government stands.

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eDiscovery 2.0's picture

Authored by: e-discovery 2.0 » Blog Archive » Federal Directive Hits Two Birds (RIM and eDiscovery) with One Stone

[...] know that the Presidential Mandate was the impetus for the agency self-assessments that were submitted to NARA. Now that NARA and the [...]

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Authored by: Federal Directive Hits Two Birds (RIM and eDiscovery) with One Stone – Electronic Discovery - Electronic Discovery - E-Discovery Resources and Guides

[...] know that the Presidential Mandate was the impetus for the agency self-assessments that were submitted to NARA. Now that NARA and the [...]

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