Video Screencast Help
Scheduled Maintenance: Symantec Connect is scheduled to be down Saturday, April 19 from 10am to 2pm Pacific Standard Time (GMT: 5pm to 9pm) for server migration and upgrades.
Please accept our apologies in advance for any inconvenience this might cause.

Opera Breach - When Cybercriminals take on Targeted Attacks

Created: 28 Jun 2013 13:47:18 GMT • Updated: 23 Jan 2014 18:05:58 GMT • Translations available: 日本語
Symantec Security Response's picture
+2 2 Votes
Login to vote

On June 26 2013, browser manufacturer Opera announced that they had been breached as a result of a targeted attack against their infrastructure. However, this was no ordinary targeted attack. The attackers in this case weren't looking to steal intellectual property. They wanted to use Opera's auto-update mechanism in order to propagate a piece of malware normally associated with financial Trojans.

When attackers breached the Opera network sometime around June 19 2013, they first stole an expired Opera code signing certificate to sign a piece of malware. Signing the malware allowed them to distribute it via Opera's auto-update mechanism. Users would receive the malware as part of a browser update. The malware in question is Downloader.Ponik, a downloader Trojan typically used to propagate cybercrime-related malware, such as financial Trojans and infostealers.

Opera, in their statement, estimates that a few thousand users may have automatically received the malware sometime between 01:00 and 01:36. Opera spotted the breach and were able to halt any further propagation of the malware. As the attackers only had a small window in which to operate they had limited success. Had they had more prolonged access to the Opera network they would have been much more successful. Or would they?

Had the attackers had access to the Opera servers for a longer period they would have been able to propagate their malware to a much larger number of users. However, such an attack would be very noisy, drawing the attention of security companies who would quickly provide protection and lead a concerted effort to take down command-and-control (C&C) servers. All of this would render the malware effectively useless. This is reminiscent of Conficker, a threat which spread to millions of computers and was due to trigger a payload on April 1, 2009. However, by that time, security organizations and hosting providers had worked together to take control of the C&C servers. The threat was being so closely monitored that the attackers were unable to leverage it.

When attackers try aggressive propagation methods they become victims of their own success. For now this attack has been neutralized. Opera recommends that users update their browsers as proactive measure against further attacks. Symantec provides protection for this as Downloader.Ponik. We also recommend that users who think they may have been affected reset their passwords.