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Sin #7: Wrath - Avoiding the 7 Deadly Sins of Windows 7

Created: 11 Nov 2009 • Updated: 03 Jun 2014 • 1 comment
CEwing's picture
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WRATH: Not taking the right steps to avoid the wrath of your CIO if the migration doesn’t go well

Every company has had its share of network or endpoint computer problems during a typical work day. These issues result in anger and frustration from the end users affected and an increased number of trouble tickets routed through the helpdesk. If communication about a migration is mishandled, these roadblocks will multiply as more end users are unable to access the applications they need to do their jobs. Unchecked, these problems can also affect the choices of key decision makers, causing negative repercussions for IT in the long run.

The human element is easy to overlook when talking technology, but communication before and during migration can go a long way in avoiding wrath throughout the process. IT managers should identify key decision makers and work closely with them throughout the process. The company’s migration should be planned out with goals and objectives, and IT managers should be able to demonstrate the success of the plan to company management.

Also, since migration affects the company as a whole, IT should also work with management and/or HR to ensure that the proper communication takes place throughout the entire organization. End-users and everybody else that will be affected by the transition should have advanced warning about what will happen, when it will take place, what to expect and how they will be affected.

After a successful roll out of the automated migration, there’s one last important step: post-migration reporting and analysis. Good reporting will enable your executive team to track the migration from a distance and will help you analyze aspects of migration. Key stakeholders will most likely have the following questions: How many clients in total are up and running on the new OS? Or more importantly, which systems have not been migrated and what is being done about them?

Upper management will likely value a formal return on investment (ROI) study. This is a prime opportunity to illustrate how the proper planning, standardization plans and automation helped accelerate the project and save money. Some key questions to ask and answer are: What were your costs for rolling out an OS before this project? What tools provided the best help to automate the process? How much did you save in terms of hard dollars and reduced resources? Were all the issues identified at the beginning of the project resolved?

Solid upfront planning, communication and post mortem analysis will help today and in the future. Because change is an ongoing process and so are software releases. You are now able to put in place a complete continuous change management process for PCs within your organization based on the best practices you’ve learned from your Windows 7 migration.

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deepak.vasudevan's picture

>>very company has had its share of network or endpoint computer problems during a typical work day. These issues result in anger and frustration from the end users affected and an increased number of trouble tickets routed through the helpdesk.

A suitable virtualization solution to test run the environments, informing the customers regarding the product lifecycle headache can alleviate much of these heartbreaks.

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