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Spam Beat: On Selling Gibberish

Created: 23 Mar 2010 19:52:08 GMT • Updated: 23 Jan 2014 18:28:46 GMT
Dylan Morss's picture
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One can be both impressed and amused at how far image spammers will go in distorting their image payloads in an attempt to slip through spam filtering technologies. If the spammer somehow manages to slip spam through spam filters from time to time, it allows email users to see how badly mangled the images must become. The images are, for all practical purposes, illegible. Take, for instance, this example below:

Seriously, Mr. Spammer, thank you for trying so hard! Perhaps this piece of Internet debris finally arrived in your potential customer’s inbox; too bad it’s more noise than message. In fact, it’s completely useless.

What is that?
Pills what?
A URL, is it?

You really expect anyone to follow through with such bad presentation?

Take a look at the ironic subject line in this particular message:

From:  "NNNN NNNNN" <NNN@openstoragelayer.com>
To:  <BBBBB@openstoragelayer.com>,
Subject: Become fit and happy again So see

“Fit and happy!” Really? How could anyone possibly trust the concoction of dubious ingredients of these supposed “medications” if utter gibberish is all that is in the promotional message alone?

Below is another example (the image again barely readable) in which the spammer has to resort to asking the user to decipher the Web address and type it into their browser. Thus, the effort required to access the payload becomes more than just a click, which is the classic process we’ve all come to expect when purchasing our spam products. Not so in this case. To quote the spammer, “DO NOT CLICK, JUST ENTER.”

Nonetheless, dear spammer, please continue to effectively make your own job more difficult and maybe shoot yourself in the foot, so to speak. With any luck, you might just run your business dry and spare us the electricity and time wasted in dealing with your “Internet marketing.”