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Storage Lifecycle Policy utility command, nbstlutil

Created: 27 May 2013 • Updated: 22 Jul 2013 • 9 comments
inn_kam's picture
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In NetBackup 7 monitoring SLP activity has been greatly simplified with the introduction of SLP reports

in OpsCenter which is discussed in more detail later in this document.

It is also possible to get an immediate view of the progress of the SLPs use the Storage Lifecycle Policy

utility command, nbstlutil. This command can be used to spot potential backlog problems before they

build up to unmanageable levels. Two options of the nbstlutil command are particularly useful for

this:

nbstlutil report – this command (which is new in NetBackup 7.1) provides a summary of

incomplete images. This command supports the –storageserver, –mediaserver and –

lifecycle qualifiers to home in on ‗hot spots‘ that may develop into backlog situations and

displays the number of duplication operations in progress (either queued or active) and the total

size of the in progress duplication jobs. This command can be very useful for identifying ‗hot

spots‘ where a backlog may be building up.

nbstlutil stlilist –image_incomplete –U – this command displays details of the unfinished

copies sorted by age and can be used to determine both the time the images have been in the

backlog and the names of the individual images. The image at the top of the list is the oldest, so

the backup time of that image is the age of the backlog. In most configurations that image should

not be more than 24 hours old. There should never be more than one backup of a particular

object pending duplication at any time.

Each image is categorized as being either NOT_STARTED or IN_PROCESS. NOT_STARTED

means that the duplication job has not yet been queued up for process. IN_PROCESS means

that the image is currently included in the process list of a queued or active duplication job.

IN_PROCESS images also display the operation which is in process, i.e. which duplication within

the hierarchy is queued or active.

nbstlutil inactive – using different qualifiers this command can be used to delay pending

duplications by suspending processing for a particular SLP (-lifcycle), storage destination (–

destination) or image (-backupid). Once this command is issued no further duplication

work is queued up for the SLP, storage destination or image until the corresponding nbstlutil

active command is issued. Setting an inactive state simply delays the processing and does not

resolve backlog issues directly. This command needs to be used in conjunction with other

actions (increasing duplication resources, reducing the amount of duplication activity or canceling

other tasks in the backlog) to resolve the backlog.

nbstlutil cancel – using different qualifiers this command can be used to cancel pending

duplications for a particular SLP (-lifcycle), storage destination (–destination) or image (-

backupid). Using this command means that the pending duplication jobs will never be

processed but will be discarded instead. Cancelling the processing reduces the backlog quickly,

but it may not be the best option in your environment.

If you plan to reduce the backlog by working on it at the individual backup level you should script the

process, using the nbstlutil stlilist –image_incomplete –U command to identify the backup

IDs of entries and passing those backup IDs to the nbstlutil cancel, inactive and active

commands.

The nbstlutil commands only tell the Storage Lifecycle Manager service (nbstserv) to stop

processing the images (to stop creating new duplication jobs for the images).

The nbstlutil command does not affect the duplication jobs that are already active or queued. Consequently, you may also need to cancel queued and active duplication jobs as well to release resources.

Taken from Symantec Netbackup Admin Guide 

 

Comments 9 CommentsJump to latest comment

Marianne's picture

You seem to shamelessly copy and paste from Semantic documentation without even referencing your sources?

This is called plagiarism!!

Supporting Storage Foundation and VCS on Unix and Windows as well as NetBackup on Unix and Windows
Handy NBU Links

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inn_kam's picture

well i have mentioned now.

sorry was forgot to mention

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CraigV's picture

...since you don't have an issue doing a copy/paste from Symantec documents (and effectively cheapen those of us who actually write PROPER blogs/articles from personal experience or simply putting our thoughts down with working in the IT industry), I thought I'd paste the definition of the Blog, straight from the Backup and Recovery Blogs section:

"The Backup and Recovery Community Blog is the perfect place to share short, timely insights including product tips, news and other information relevant to the Backup and Recovery community. Any authenticated Connect member can contribute to this blog."

 

If you can't do this, don't paste nonsense...as mentioned before, you're cheapening what has been done in the past with proper blogs.

Thanks!

Alternative ways to access Backup Exec Technical Support:

https://www-secure.symantec.com/connect/blogs/alte...

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inn_kam's picture

okz

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Marianne's picture

With the wealth of TechNotes, manuals, TechNotes, White Papers, Best Practice Guides all available online, I feel it is unethical simply copying and pasting (not even correcting the formatting) from these documents and post it as a blog.

Carrying on like this means we can all make a 'killing' earning Connect points by simply copying publicly available documentation.

Supporting Storage Foundation and VCS on Unix and Windows as well as NetBackup on Unix and Windows
Handy NBU Links

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inn_kam's picture

next time i will took care of it,

okz

 

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CraigV's picture

...just stop doing that! Posting official Symantec information offers no personal experience!

Alternative ways to access Backup Exec Technical Support:

https://www-secure.symantec.com/connect/blogs/alte...

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Marianne's picture

Leslie's definition of blogs and articles:

https://www-secure.symantec.com/connect/blogs/whats-difference-between-blog-and-article-content-explained

This copy& paste from Symantec documentation does not seem to fit the criteria.

Supporting Storage Foundation and VCS on Unix and Windows as well as NetBackup on Unix and Windows
Handy NBU Links

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inn_kam's picture

thanks for above link, 

i will follow from now on

 

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