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Backup Exec 2012 - Hardware sizing

Created: 15 Jan 2013 • Updated: 16 Jan 2013 | 10 comments
This issue has been solved. See solution.

Hi,

Hope someone can help me on this.

I plan to deploy Dell R720xd

1x Intel E5-2630 (2.3 Ghz, 6C/12T)

2x 300GB 10K sas

12x 3 TB NL SAS

1x H710

16 GB RAM

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Server will function as a VMS (Axis Camera Station - 25 Cameras) server.

I also plan to install backup exec 2012 on this server to backup my video files to tape (LTO5)

Each backup will be around 2.8 TB.

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Questions

1 Would it be ok if I used the setup above ? (Combining my VMS and Media Server at the same time)?

       I planned it this way to avoid network congestion when I execute a backup...

2. Can anyone recommend a backup hardware specs to backup 3 TB worth of data weekly?

3. Would 16 GB RAM be ok ? (Axis Camera station requires 4 GB RAM only)

4. Is my processor suffecient to execute a backup ? (Axis Camera station requires dual core processor with 2 GHz speed only)

5. As I remember an agent is included by default for the backup exec media server to backup itself ?

Thanks,

Paul

Comments 10 CommentsJump to latest comment

CraigV's picture

Hi,

the hardware looks fine, certainly RAM-wise, although if you can get a second CPU in there that will make things better.

No reason not to use an application server as a backup server either...if you can't get a dedicated server, and have enough grunt (looks like you do), then you can use it.

Thanks!

Alternative ways to access Backup Exec Technical Support:

https://www-secure.symantec.com/connect/blogs/alte...

SOLUTION
teiva-boy's picture

Your hardware is more than sufficient, covering enough for BE, The Axis camera feeds, and the OS.

Your biggest bottleneck will be the tape out, and what is needed to tune properly to get the most speed out of it, and sending near 3TB of data out to tape in a reasonable amount of time.  You will tune the tape block sizes BEFORE you put backups into production, as tweaking them later will make the two backup sets incompatible.

There is an online portal, save yourself the long hold times. Create ticket online, then call in with ticket # in hand :-) http://mysupport.symantec.com "We backup data to restore, we don't backup data just to back it up."

pkh's picture

There should not be a problem changing the block or buffer sizes in mid-stream.  As long as the tape drive can handle the different blocksizes, it is o.k

pkh's picture

@Paul - As previously advised, you should tune your tape drive to get maximum performance.  See my article below on my tuning experience.

https://www-secure.symantec.com/connect/articles/t...

You can do it at a later stage because a tuning exercise is a long process of trying out various settings to get the optimum one.

Since you are backing up video files which are most likely to be compressed.  You should not use any compression, software or hardware, in your backup job.  Otherwise you might end up with more data than you have started with.  See my article below for an explanation

https://www-secure.symantec.com/connect/articles/c...

teiva-boy's picture

In the real world, compressing an already compressed file is negligible in terms of overall growth on a small scale.  Less than 1%.

And in some cases changing your tape block size larger, means restores must be made from the tape drive set at that setting.  Failure to do so, and restore from one still stuck at 64kb will result in an error in some cases, and is well documented in most all backup products, i.e. Symantec, EMC, Commvault, etc.  Interesting note that in EMC's product they have now defaulted to 256KB I believe for all LTO2-6 devices.  They also state to test restores with older tapes after this setting is changed.

There is an online portal, save yourself the long hold times. Create ticket online, then call in with ticket # in hand :-) http://mysupport.symantec.com "We backup data to restore, we don't backup data just to back it up."

pkh's picture

Re: compressioin.  I beg to differ.  Try zipping up a zipped file or a movie file.

Of course, during a tuning exercise, one cannot assume that one can restore an old backup of a different blocksize.  That is where the testing comes in.  This is one reason why tuning is a long drawn-out process.

pmevalenzuela's picture

Hi,

Does this mean that a video file cannot be compressed when written to tape ?

If I have 2 TB worth of video files will this fit on a LTO5 disk?

Thanks,

Paul

pkh's picture

It is unlikely that your 2TB worth of video is going to go onto a LTO5 disk.  Even if you don't use compression, it will exceed the native capacity of a LTO5 tape which is only 1.6TB.  If you use compression it will be much worse.

Even with a normal mix of data, it is touch-and-go whether 2TB of data can go onto a LTO5 tape.with compression.

CraigV's picture

No way of knowing that Paul. Normally video files are already compressed and don't compress further...

Thanks!

Alternative ways to access Backup Exec Technical Support:

https://www-secure.symantec.com/connect/blogs/alte...