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Encrypting files to share

Created: 05 Apr 2011 | 3 comments

I am using PGP WDE and Desktop on a macintosh.  I would like to be able to encrypt single files that I can then send or give to other users.  Is there a way to create an encrypted file such as a spreadsheet, send it to someone and have that person be able to unencrypt it by using a  public key or something.  The person most likely will not have PGP installed on their pc.

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Sarah Mays's picture

PGP Desktop on mac doesn't support self decrypting archives, pgp desktop on windows does. with self decrypting archives the user receiving the encrypted file does not need to have pgp installed. SDA's only use a passphrase for encryption (no keys)

Also, SDA's are exe files, a lot of email servers block exe files from being sent or received.

Tom Mc's picture

Of course Sarah is correct - I don't know why the SDA was discontinued for Macs, or if they are currently feasible.  However, you can make this a feature request if you would like to:

http://www.pgp.com/products/feature_request_form.html

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jc1350's picture

There are plenty of ways to encrypt files.  You could use Truecrypt to create encrypted images.  Truecrypt works with Mac OS, Linux, and Windows.

You can use Gnu Privacy Guard (a free implementation of OpenPGP).  With GPG you can encrypt individual files with keys or with symmetric cyphers.  There is a version of GPG for all three OS families.

If both parties have Mac OS or Linux you can use openssl to encrypt files.  There may even be a Windows version of openssl.

I'm sure there are others - almost too many from which to choose.

I wish this commercial PGP product could be an all-in-one for Mac users, but alas, that is not meant to be. I actually find GPG's mail integration to be much better than PGP's.   The only thing I'm getting out of PGP is the whole-disk encryption and Mac OS 10.7 may make that moot.