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SAN space increase and VVR configuration with no application downtime

Created: 21 Jan 2012 • Updated: 24 Jan 2012 | 2 comments
This issue has been solved. See solution.

Trying to configure VVR after adding SAN space without application downtime on Solaris 10 OS.

On 09/08/2011 Heim Wally from Symantec posted the following solution in relation to Windows OS:

As you mentioned, you can increase the size of a volume in two ways.

1. You can add another disk to the servers, add it to the disk group, then expand the volume on to the new disk (assuming that you are not running a stripe or RAID5 volume.)  This can be done with no down time to the application at all - AKA it can be done on a live production system.

2. You can increase the size of the existing lun being presented and then expand the volume to the extra space on the lun.  There are some concerns with this approach.

a. If the disk style is GPT then the process can be done online wihtout much concern.

b. If the disk style is MBR, then you should run vxcbr.exe to take a manual backup of the private region before expanding the lun.  The reason for this is the private region for MBR disks are at the end of the disk.  SFW should during the next rescan move the private region to the new end of the lun.  However, if there are problems moving the private region then the disk will revert to the basic group.  If the private region does not move then access to the data will be lost until the vxcbr backup is restored.  Also keep in mind that MBR disks have a max size of just under 2TB (2TB - 4KB I think.)

Can option 1 be executed on Solaris 10 OS? If so, please provide detailed commands or a reference to documentation with detailed VVR commands.

Thank  you.

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mikebounds's picture

Yes you can do this on Solaris:

If you have free space in diskgroup then you can use existing free space in diskgroup - to find out (on BOTH sites):

 vxdg free

or

 vxassist -g dg_name maxgrow volume

If you haven't got enough space then add a new disk:

 vxdg -g dg_name adddisk disk_device

Then increase volume:

 vradmin -g dg_name resizevol rvg_name volume_name vol_size

vol_size can be new size of volume or increase in size by using preceding "+".  So if you were increasing from 10GB to 15GB you could use vol_size of 15g or +5g.

Note you should make sure VVR is connected and up to date before running this command  as this will extend volume on both VVR primary and secondary.

Mike

 

UK Symantec Consultant in VCS, GCO, SF, VVR, VxAT on Solaris, AIX, HP-ux, Linux & Windows

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Gaurav Sangamnerkar's picture

Yes, its possible ..

Refer to VVR admin guide, section "Resizing a data volume in a Replicated Data Set"..

A quick snap from 5.0MP3 guide of solaris:

 

The vradmin resizevol command enables you to resize a data volume in a
Replicated Data Set (RDS) even when replication is in progress. You can resize an
independent data volume or a component volume of a volume set. You cannot use
the vradmin resizevol command to resize an entire volume set, only individual
component volumes. The vradmin resizevol command resizes the data volumes
in all the RVGs in the RDS. The vradmin resizevol command can be entered
from any host in an RDS.

 

Caution: To avoid any problems with the file system on the Secondary, run the
vradmin resizevol command only when the Secondary is up-to-date. VVR
replicates changes to the meta data of a file system on the Primary data volumes
to the Secondary. If a takeover happens while these changes are yet to be applied
to the Secondary data volumes, the size of the file system may not match the size
of the underlying data volume and it may not be possible to mount the file system
on the new Primary. If this occurs, run the file system-specific commands to
recover the file system.

Important notes on resizing a data volume in a Replicated Data
Set
Observe the following notes on resizing a data volume in a Replicated Data Set:
■ If the Primary data volume contains a file system, the vradmin resizevol
command also resizes the file system using the vxresize command. For more
information, see the vxresize(1M) manual page.
■ The vradmin resizevol command pauses replication, resizes the data volume,
and then resumes replication.
■ If you want to increase the size of a data volume, make sure there is enough
space on the Primary and the Secondary.

 

Note: When you increase the size of a data volume, the newly added portions
on the Primary and Secondary data volumes are not synchronized. In this case,
the output of the vradmin verifydata command will show that the checksums
for the Primary and Secondary data volumes do not match.
■ If the vradmin resizevol command fails on any of the hosts in the RDS during
its execution, the original volume sizes are not restored. This results in volume
size mismatch on the Primary and its Secondaries. To correct this mismatch,
correct the error condition and then reissue the vradmin resizevol command
and resume the Secondary RLINKs

.
Prerequisites for resizing a data volume in an RDS

The following items are the prerequisites for resizing a data volume in an RDS:
■ The data volume must exist in the disk group and be associated with the RVGs
for all hosts in the RDS.

■ If you want to increase the size of a data volume, make sure there is enough
space in the disk group on the Primary and the Secondary by issuing the
following command:
# vxdg -g diskgroup free
◆ To resize a volume in an RDS:
# vradmin -g diskgroup [-f] resizevol local_rvgname \
volume_name volume_length
The argument local_rvgname is the name of the RVG on the local host and
represents its RDS. The -f option is required if the data volume involved in
the resizevol operation is being decreased in size.
The argument volume_name is the name of the data volume to be resized. You
can specify a component volume of a volume set. Do not specify a volume set
name.
The argument volume_length is the desired size of the data volume to be
resized. You can specify the volume length using the standard length
convention. You can specify a prefix of either the plus (+) or minus (-) sign to
increase or decrease the data volume size by the specified amount.
Examples:
The following examples show how to resize to different lengths an existing volume
hr_dv01 in all RVGs of the RDS represented by its local RVG hr_rvg. The disk
group hrdg contains the local RVG hr_rvg.
To resize the volume hr_dv01 to 100 gigabytes, type the following command on
any host in the RDS:
# vradmin -g hrdg resizevol hr_rvg hr_dv01 100G
To increase the size of the data volume hr_dv01 by 100 megabytes when the
Primary and Secondary data volumes are the same size, type the following
command on any host in the RDS:
# vradmin -g hrdg resizevol hr_rvg hr_dv01 +100M
To decrease the size of the data volume hr_dv01 by 500K when the Primary and
Secondary data volumes are the same size, type the following command on any
host in the RDS:
# vradmin -g hrdg -f resizevol hr_rvg hr_dv01 -500K

 

G

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