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SEP Store definitions on drive with most space

Created: 06 Jun 2012 | 4 comments
Serengeti's picture
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SEP11 client now requires a minmum of approx 1.5 GB free disk space on the C: drive in order to be able to install newer virus defs. There are always a minimum of 4 def files present which consume almost 1GB disk space. Can Symantec make a change to unpack the defs on the drive with the most free disk space?

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Serengeti's picture

Just to clarify, we are concerned with the spike in space requirement on C: when SEP11 LiveUpdate (Windows LiveUpdate) is busy expanding the content being downloaded from the LiveUpdate server. Can this "expansion" be directed to take place e.g. on the D: drive. It is good practice to not have application activity on C: drive, which is where the OS belongs. C: drives can get very low on space especially on older systems. If not for SEP11, then could this be changed for a later release of SEP 12.x ?

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chris_delay's picture

SEP 12.1, by default, is limited to keeping 1 revision of definitions.  I'm sure there will be moments when you might see 2 sets (if, for example, SEP is updating definitions)...but, in a normally functioning client, it's one set of definitions.

While I know this doesn't directly speak to the suggestion, I'm just saying it as an FYI, on the off chance that you didn't know about it in 12.1.

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dsmith1954's picture

Seen it in other apps that Symantec has - Endpoint Management for example. I install SEP/SEPM on the D: drive, and expect that everything related to that application be installed on the D: drive. Nope, Symantec dumps a lot of other stuff on the C: drive.

To be fair, Symantec isn't the only vendor that does that, but this is a Symantec forum. :-)

I'd give a thousand votes to this one if I could. Keep the complete app on the drive where I install the app. It shouldn't be that hard to do. A simple registry entry and read of the registry should do it.

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Ian_C.'s picture

Please let me specify a drive & stick to that.

Windows Update works in the smae fashion as you suggest. Just like SEP not always cleaning up old definitions properly, Windows Update doesn't always cleanup properly & you get random character folder all over the place.

I agree with dsmith1954. Let me choose the destination & stick to that. Do not hardcode the destination to C:, especially not %APPDATA% which can change for every user.

 

Please mark the post that best solves your problem as the answer to this thread.
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