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Design@Symantec
Showing posts tagged with Usability
Showing posts in English
Reshma Kumar | 03 Jun 2011 | 0 comments

Overview:
The VeriSign Seal is an important offering for the company as well as a symbol of trust for many online. As we started to offer more ways customers could get the seal, it introduced some confusion. Customers can either buy the seal by itself or buy an SSL Certificate which includes the seal.

Problem:
The VeriSign Seal page has two main goals - one, to help customers understand the two options for getting the seal and what the differences are; and two, to help them install the seal. The modifications we made the the existing page did not seem to be addressing this clearly enough. The first call to action on the page was to install the seal which seemed to suggest you could simply install the seal without purchasing it. And, the second call to action was to buy SSL Certificates which seemed to be divergent from the subject of the page as it didn't provide enough context as to why it located there.

...

Reshma Kumar | 19 May 2011 | 0 comments

A/B Test Experiences

Balancing between providing too much and too little information upfront, can seem like a bit of a high-wire act at times. Do you link to another page for more information or provide it by default at the risk of overwhelming users?

To inform our decision-making process in an instance where we encountered this, we conducted an A/B test to assess users' behaviors real-time. We had heard from our users that they wanted system information but were unsure how best to provide it. So, we tested two versions of the same page - one page had the system requirements information appear by default on the page (Experience A) and the other page had a hyperlink to a page with the system requirements (Experience B). In both experiences, this information was positioned in the same spot where it was contextually relevant to the 'buy' call to action. The...

Reshma Kumar | 15 Apr 2011 | 2 comments

Number of People Without JavaScript

There is a lot of debate sometimes on whether to create a non-JavaScript (JS) version of a web page to support users without JS.

This can seem like a no-brainer initially as it would seem that everyone has JS enabled. The percentage of users online with JS disabled is a mere 2-3% depending on where you look. JS functionality is also supported on the mobile platform which is growing steadily. And besides, how unexciting would it be to traverse the web sans JS - imagine all the cool functionality you would miss!

All that aside though, site owners can sometimes only gleen analytics on users with JS enabled to improve the user experience. But, the reality is that some users just don't like JS for privacy reasons or they don't have JS support because they have an older or non-JS browser, etc.

However, much of it...

Reshma Kumar | 07 Apr 2011 | 0 comments

We enjoy hearing from our users. We monitor user feedback daily which we receive via the handy "Feedback" link on our websites. We look forward to it and find it invaluable. Some of the feedback comes in foreign languages, some of it is spirited, and some indecipherable. But both the positive and negative feedback help us understand where we need to improve - which we take very seriously.

User feedback has helped us catch errors, understand how users use the sites and what they are looking for, improve user experiences, and address concerns. A good example of the latter is a comment we received just yesterday where a user's anti-virus software (and hopefully, it was Norton's) thought it had detected malware on a third-party widget on our sites. The comment was in German so after a quick Google Translate, it loosely translated to:

...

Reshma Kumar | 06 Jan 2011 | 0 comments

It's a brand new year and a time for new beginnings. And with that, we are debuting a brand new homepage for VeriSign.com and putting forth a brand new face to the world.

As the company, brand, and user experience evolve, so is the homepage in response to these changes!

Design - More Visual and Intuitive
With the redesigned homepage, the end goal is to get the page working even harder in meeting the needs of our users. Through the use of thoughtful design and content, we have made changes to further improve the usability and usefulness of the homepage.

While the page is still structurally the same, it's the elements in the page and their layout which have changed. The overall design is a little punchier than the previous iteration, there a little more injection of color, and the page elements are clearly defined and more accessible.

...

Reshma Kumar | 29 Sep 2010 | 0 comments

AccordionIn looking at the accordion on the right hand-side of our VeriSign homepage, we find that it performs relatively well. But we felt that "I need to" was more actionable than a more benign "Information for" label and perhaps we should switch the order of the two because the links which were displayed by default would get more clicks. So, we set out to test that theory.

We ran an A/B test and found that usefulness trumped accessibility. Despite the expectation that the panel of links which was exposed by default would get more clicks than links in collapsed panels, that was not the case. When the "Information for" panel was second and its links were therefore hidden by default, users still clicked on the links in that panel more than the exposed "I need to" links. So, despite the position of "Information for" - whether it was first or second - it was clear that users...

Reshma Kumar | 07 Sep 2010 | 0 comments

In an effort to optimize the effectiveness of the VeriSign.com homepage banner, we recently did some testing to maximize response rates. The homepage banner is a multi-message banner with four 'buttons' each representing four individual messages.

The Goal
The goal was to test which sequence of buttons was the most compelling and therefore, garnered the most clicks. We were not testing the copy, layout, imagery, or color palette as part of this test; this was previously done in usability testing.

The Test
Along with the control, we deployed different versions of the banner with the order of the first button being displayed varying. What we found was that the button positioned first (from left to right) always got the most number of clicks - likely by virtue of being the first and easiest and quickest to access, and the other three buttons got varying numbers of clicks...

Reshma Kumar | 31 Aug 2010 | 0 comments

For ease of access, we have added a 'Buy' button to the very top of the Trust Seal landing page. This helps to ensure that it is easily visible and accessible to users and that it doesn't get missed further down the page where a user might be required to scroll to see it. This also serves to facilitate quick and easy access for the returning user who has already done their research and knows what they want. So, rather than force them to wade through the content again, the action button is at the top and forefront of the page.

The page subtitle has also been updated to reflect a more meaningful and relevant message for customers at a glance i.e. who the product is for and how much - "Perfect for Small Businesses at $299 a year".

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Reshma Kumar | 15 Jul 2010 | 3 comments

We've been working on better differentiating on our site standard hyperlinks from link tips which render a popup callout bubble. What's your vote?

QUESTION 1:

Option 1: Do you prefer the 'help' cursor onmouseover for link tips?
Help cursor

Option 2: Or the 'text' cursor onmouseover for link tips?
Text cursor

QUESTION 2:

Option 1: Do you prefer the solid underlining for link tips as well as standard links?

Solid underlining for links and link tips

...
Reshma Kumar | 31 Mar 2010 | 0 comments

We recently did a redesign of the Identity and Authentication Services section of the Website. Not only are the taxonomy and content revamped, but the design look and feel has been improved. The landing page layout is less boxy, the value prop and key content are more clearly defined through the use of more CSS-driven text formatting and more visual icons, and the free trial is scaled down but still prominent and pops.

The four product landing pages follow a similar format with the anchor image top left to draw the eye, compliment the content, and break up the text; a promotional banner or item, and the individual product listing with a scannable overview blurb and link to the product specific information page. Rounding out the page content is the option to contact us for more information if needed and flanking the right side of the page is that option as well clearly labeled as 'Contact Us'. The...