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Encryption Blog

Showing posts tagged with Endpoint Encryption
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Brian Tokuyoshi | 06 Jul 2009 | 0 comments

Brian Tokuyoshi - Product Marketing Manager

Most people agree that open standards are good for everyone. Standards help companies deploy products that work together with existing investments, thus reducing the impact and issues of technology displacement. They help developers build products by not having to reinvent the wheel, and build upon the work that has already been done. It establishes some common ground that bridges the gap between the interdependencies for related products.

Perhaps one of the challenges for standards is recognizing the need for one, and the unforeseen and currently unattainable future that provides the benefit for all. Standards do not emerge without a need in the market, which typically originates from the proliferation of one-off proprietary technologies. The creators of said proprietary technologies tend to not want to give ground to an open standard, because they profit by locking in customers to their interpretation of...

Brian Tokuyoshi | 01 Jul 2009 | 0 comments

Brian Tokuyoshi - Product Marketing Manager

Are you working on some big secrets that you need to keep safe? I am talking about REALLY BIG ones.  Where can you get a tool that will handle your needs?

When I say “big secrets” I am actually referring to physical size, not sensitivity of the data. That’s because that a very large (13 foot long, 6 feet wide) device for encryption is now available on eBa.

At the RSA 2009 Conference in San Francisco, Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage from the MythBusters television show provided an entertaining closing keynote speech. On the TV show, the duo act as skeptics of urban myths, and use large scale science experiments to test whether common beliefs hold water. At the conference, they used this device as part of their opening act. ...

Brian Tokuyoshi | 30 Jun 2009 | 0 comments

Brian Tokuyoshi - Product Marketing Manager

When people new to cryptography first start to learn about public keys, they start with the basics, usually involving a person named Alice and a person named Bob. One maxim that they learn is that a message encrypted by one’s public key could only be decrypted with the corresponding private key. (I get a little tired of reading about analogies with Alice and Bob, so I’m going to use different names. Let’s go with Angelina and Brad). If Angelina wants to send Brad a private message, she uses a copy of his public key to encrypt the message. Brad, the recipient, uses his private key to access the message. That portion of public key cryptography is easily understood.

Now let’s take an example using encrypted email, which often has more than one recipient.  If Angelina sends an encrypted email to two people, and uses the public key for each person, shouldn’t there be two...

Brian Tokuyoshi | 24 Jun 2009 | 0 comments

Brian Tokuyoshi - Product Marketing Manager

I remember the first time that I heard about PGP software.  It was in the mid 90s, and I was working on email systems at the time, dealing with the vast number of proprietary email formats and building gateways to get the messages from one system to another. During this time, it became clear to me that the system for trust in email was fairly broken – it was trivial for anyone to impersonate another person, tampering and modifying the content was possible, and the administrators had full access to see everyone’s data. The whole system of trust for Internet email really depended on hoping that there weren’t bad guys looking to cause problems.

I started using PGP software more for personal than business reasons.  I was concerned about my privacy because I knew how much power system administrators had. So for the last 14 years or so, I’ve been using PGP to protect email and...

Doug McLean | 22 Jun 2009 | 0 comments

I've been reviewing some of the other blogs covering cybercrime and want to share with you five that I've found most interesting.

Kenyantykoon's Blog on African Cybercrime: A very good country-by-country summary of one of the hot beds of cybercrime.

Cybercrime and Doing Time: One of the older blogs on cybercrime written by Gary Warner, Director of Research in Computer Forensics at the University of Alabama.  He tends to focus on spam and phishing scams.  He writes very cogently about cybercrime. This is a typical post on the current Bank of America phishing scam.

Schneier on Security: Not specifically focused on cybercrime, but deals with it frequently...

Doug McLean | 16 Jun 2009 | 0 comments

The Data Loss Database is a record of data breaches going back to 1995. As such it is one of the most comprehensive records of global breaches. Maintained by the Open Security Foundation, the DataLoss DB is published monthly. Below is the classification of all recorded breaches by sector since 1995.

data-loss-db-sector

Doug McLean | 16 Jun 2009 | 0 comments

The Data Loss Database is a record of data breaches going back to 1995. As such it is one of the most comprehensive records of global breaches. Maintained by the Open Security Foundation, the DataLoss DB is published monthly. Below is the classification of all recorded breaches by source since 1995.

data-loss-db-source

Brian Tokuyoshi | 04 Jun 2009 | 2 comments

Brian Tokuyoshi - Product Marketing Manager

btokuyoshi_webfinalBy and large, the most popular use for the PGP Whole Disk Encryption product is to encrypt the primary hard drive on laptops.  This is a use case that addresses very specific requirements to prevent the loss of sensitive data on missing portable computing hardware.  With PGP Whole Disk Encryption, the laptop stays completely secure and safe from the eyes of unauthorized personnel.

Did you know that there’s a lot more that you can do with PGP Whole Disk Encryption? There are a number of additional functions that it provides to help you keep your data safe.

More than ever, companies are using electronic statements to deliver documents. As a result, employees have a number of personal documents...

Shilpi Dey | 26 May 2009 | 0 comments

sdeyShilpi Dey - Product Marketing Manager

There is no doubt that firewalls are no longer sufficient as the sole security strategy of choice. Whether it’s your telecommuting employees, consultants, vendors, or your sales force in the field, securing those endpoints is more crucial than ever.

It seems everywhere you turn, there is a new endpoint solution or better yet, an endpoint security suite that is sure to make you, the security administrator’s, life easy with a comprehensive endpoint protection offering. Most of these solutions offer anti-virus, host intrusion prevention, VPN, and data encryption all rolled into a convenient client and centrally managed by the same administration interface. These solutions are often tempting to procure and deploy, especially given...

Kevin Albright | 19 May 2009 | 0 comments

Kevin AlbrightA recent data breach at Johns Hopkins Hospital was announced that resulted from a single employee working in patient registration who accessed more than 10,000 pieces of personally identifying information. Reports of fraud started back in January and have been traced to records at Johns Hopkins.

The employee in question has been linked to a larger driver’s license fraud scheme in nearby Virginia. These types of incidents have been appearing more and more; while we protect against attacks coming across the internet with firewalls, and malware...