Video Screencast Help
Encryption Blog
Showing posts in English
Brian Tokuyoshi | 03 Mar 2009 | 0 comments

Brian Tokuyoshi - Product Marketing Manager

As the Academy Awards wrap up, I’m reminded of the film Amadeus, which won the Oscar for Best Picture in 1985. The eponymous film is a dramatization about the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. In a famous scene, Emperor Joseph II, offering his opinion on Mozart’s new symphony, comments that,  “There are simply too many notes”, without providing any deeper insight into which particular sequence trouble him.

Enterprises today are facing a related situation, except the issue should be called “too many encryption keys” as well as its closely related issue called “too many encryption products”. Let’s take a common example. Growing concerns about data breach notification laws lead ACME company to deploy a disk encryption product. Over time new requirements emerge, and ACME realizes that they need to...

Doug McLean | 02 Mar 2009 | 0 comments

Top Seven Causes of Data Breach 2008

Sources of Breach - UK


Every year PGP Corporation sponsors a series of research projects to determine trends and costs of data breach. These projects are carried out by the Ponemon Institute. Currently, this research is carried out in the U.S., UK and Germany. This week’s G-Blog illuminates the top sources of data breaches in the UK in 2008.  The full reports are available...

Doug McLean | 25 Feb 2009 | 0 comments

I wrote about this case in October and thought at the time it represented a case of prosecutorial indulgence. The issue at stake here is whether or not an undocumented immigrant that uses false identification can be charged with identity theft if the data on the false documentation actually belongs to someone else.

To be clear, the case does not address the issues associated with immigrating illegally or using false documents to obtain work or social benefits. Even the defendent's counsel concedes his client is guilty of those infractions. The sole issue in question here is if you create or purchase a fake Social Security card with an I.D. number on it that belongs to someone else, have you in addition committed identity theft.  It seems like a reach to me and  in October the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case. Based on this...

Doug McLean | 23 Feb 2009 | 0 comments

Cost of Breach by Industry
Every year PGP Corporation sponsors a series of research projects to determine trends and costs of data breach. These projects are carried out by the Ponemon Institute. Currently, this research is carried out in the U.S., UK and Germany. This week’s G-Blog illuminates the cost of breach per record for five industrial sectors.  The full reports are available here.

Doug McLean | 22 Feb 2009 | 1 comment

WARNING: This posting is off topic.  It's going to happen occasionally.

To be clear, I've never met Peggy Noonan, nor do I ever expect to. As such it's not really Ms. Noonan herself with whom I'm in love. It's her writing. For the last year or more, my regular Saturday morning routine has included reading her column on the op-ed page of the Wall Street Journal. Normally, Ms. Noonan covers political matters, but this week's column focuses on the impact of an apparently still deepening recession. I'll get back to this week's column in a minute, but first let me tell you a few things about Ms. Noonan.

Peggy Noonan first came to national prominence as Ronald Reagan's speech writer. Her book on the experience, What I Saw at the Revolution, is considered one of...

Doug McLean | 16 Feb 2009 | 0 comments

Average Cost of Breach Per Record

Cost of Breach by Industry UK

Every year PGP Corporation sponsors a series of research projects to determine trends and costs of data breach. These projects are carried out by the Ponemon Institute. Currently, this research is carried out in the U.S., UK and Germany. This week’s G-Blog illuminates the cost of data breach on a per record basis for each of nine sectors.  The full reports are available...

Doug McLean | 09 Feb 2009 | 0 comments

Average Cost of Breach U.S.

Every year PGP Corporation sponsors a series of research projects to determine trends and costs of data breach. These projects are carried out by the Ponemon Institute. Currently, this research is carried out in the U.S., UK and Germany. This week's G-Blog illuminates the increasing cost of a data breach amongst U.S. participants in the 2008 study.  The full reports are available here.

Shilpi Dey | 03 Feb 2009 | 0 comments

Shilpi Dey - Product Marketing Manager

It arrived in a non-descript envelope, similar to the ones promising exciting credit card offers. I would have tossed it in the recycling bin without opening, except that it was from one of the banks (let’s call it bank “B”) where I had an account, and something made me pause and break open the seal. The letter inside explained that some CDs and tapes containing some of my personal information were lost while being transported to an off-site storage facility. The letter reassured me that security is Bank B’s top priority; however, their archive services vendor had notified them that they could not account for one of several boxes of tapes and CDs being transported to their off-site storage facility. The missing media contained some personal information such as name, address, Social Security number and/or shareowner account information. I was especially relieved that though Bank B had not yet...

Doug McLean | 02 Feb 2009 | 0 comments

A couple of days after I wrote last week that we will likely see an increase in the incidence of cybercrime as the world weathers the recession, the Wall Street Journal, in its role as an actual news gathering organization, documented what some analysts are seeing.

The bulk of the story appears based on an interview with Avivah Litan of the Gartner Group as many of the facts in the store come from presentations I've seen Ms. Litan do at various Gartner conferences. She is, incidently, one of the most articulate analysts covering the cybercrime space. If you ever have a chance to see her speak...do. The story also contains some data from the FBIs Internet Crime Complaint Center, but as it dates from , it doesn't really shed much light on what's happening currently.

The most interesting part of the story for me is the...