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Showing posts tagged with Wise Packaging
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R-Vijay | 16 Oct 2007 | 2 comments

Here are a few tips I picked up from Microsoft about how to "color inside the lines" when using any tool (including Wise Package Studio) to create an MSI. Hope these help.

  • Match components in previous versions of the MSI:
    1. Keypath resource matches a resource in previous .MSI list
    2. Match component layout of previous .MSI
    3. Set component key to match previous version.
  • Add all executable files to their own components
  • Create new component for the resource
  • Add all .TLB files to their own components
  • Group matching .HLP and .CNT files together
  • Group matching .CHM and .CHI files together
  • Put registry keys associated with files or components in matching components.
  • Put current user registry keys in their own component
  • Put non-current user registry keys in their own component.
  • Group all non-executable files to...
WiseUser | 16 Oct 2007 | 0 comments

As a matter of best practices, we have a standard way to increment version numbers and codes based on the extent of the upgrade. I thought this might be useful to others in the community who are faced with similar challanges. As always, these worked for us but your mileage may vary.

Small Update

  • Package Code - change
  • Product Version - don't change
  • Product Code - don't change
  • Upgrade Code - don't change

Minor Update

  • Package Code - change
  • Product Version - change
  • Product Code - don't change
  • Upgrade Code - don't change

Major Upgrade

  • Package Code - change
  • Product Version - change
  • Product Code - change
  • Upgrade Code - don't change
WiseUser | 16 Oct 2007 | 0 comments

Here's a quick step-by-step that walks you through the process necessary to set up your packaging system so it creates packages (all packages) with elevated privileges.

  1. Start a registry editor (e.g., regedit.exe).
  2. Navigate to:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Installer
    
    
  3. From the Edit menu, select New, DWORD Value.
  4. Enter the name AlwaysInstallElevated, then press Enter.
  5. Double-click the new value, set it to 1, then click OK.
  6. Navigate to:
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Installer
    
    
  7. From the Edit menu, select New, DWORD Value.
  8. Enter the name AlwaysInstallElevated, then press Enter.
  9. Double-click the new value, set it to 1, then click OK.
  10. Close the registry editor.
WiseUser | 15 Oct 2007 | 3 comments

MSIZAP: A cool little utility that removes the MSI meta data from your computer. Us it when (for some reason) uninstall is broken and won't freakin' do it's job ... uninstall.

Actually, msizap does NOT remove any of the files or registry entries that were added by the installation. It only cleans out the Windows Installer's internal database of information so that it LOOKS to Windows Installer as if things have been uninstalled, but the files are left on the hard drive (and need to be cleaned up by hand).

It's useful when uninstall is broken (e.g. you get part way through uninstall and for some reason, the uninstall fails and rollsback to the installed state).

If all you need to do is uninstall something that isn't in add/remove programs for some reason, then yes msiexec /x is a better approach.

Reference: Learn more...

R-Vijay | 15 Oct 2007 | 3 comments

Here's a command you can use to assign permissions to a registry key. You can write this action using VBScript or WiseScript. As this script needs admin privileges to work, run this action in system context in deffered execution.

SetACL.exe -on "hklm\software\microsoft\policies" -ot reg -actn ace
-ace "n:domain1\user1;p:full"

This command sets 'full' permissions on the registry key 'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Policies' for user 'user1' in domain 'domain1'.

Cheers'
Vijay Raj

WiseUser | 15 Oct 2007 | 0 comments

Here's a quick primer designed to help you get your head around the UI options in Wise Package Studio. These options can help you pull off installs that range from showing the user the entire installation process to hiding it all and doing an install in "stealth" mode.

Full UI - Displays modal and modeless dialog boxes that have been authored into the internal UI.Modal dialog boxes require user input before the installation can continue.A modeless dialog box does not require user input for the installation to continue.

Reduced UI - Displays any modeless dialog boxes that have been authored into the UI. Does not display any authored modal dialog boxes.

Basic UI - Displays the built-in modeless dialog boxes that show progress messages. Displays built-in error dialog boxes. Does...

R-Vijay | 09 Oct 2007 | 5 comments

If your Windows Installer package contains more than 32767 files, you must change the schema of the database to increase the limit of the following columns: the Sequence column of the File table, the LastSequence column of the Media table, and the Sequence column of the Patch table. Note that transforms and patches cannot be created between two packages with different column types.

Total number of components

The maximum number of rows for the Component table is 65536.

Number of components per feature

There is a maximum limit of 1600 components per feature using Windows NT/Windows 2000 and a maximum limit of 800 components per feature using Windows 95 and Windows 98. There will be a ICE47 validation warning if your package is above this limit.

Depth of Feature tree

There is a maximum limit of 16 for the depth of the feature tree. If you exceed this limit you get a runtime error message "2701. The Component table exceeds the acceptable...

R-Vijay | 08 Oct 2007 | 6 comments

The MSI format lets you easily modify or customize the software install by creating a transform. An MSI transform is a file (.mst) that describes how WIS (Windows Installer Service) should install an MSI package. The four types of Windows Installer transforms are embedded, unembedded, secured, and unsecured.

Embedded transforms:

Embedded transforms are stored inside the .msi file of the package. This guarantees to users that the transform is always available when the installation package is available.

If the installation source is read-only, such as a CD or a network share to which the person creating the transform has read-only access, this is not an option because you must be able to write to the source to embed the transform in the *.msi file.

To add an embedded transform to the transforms list, add a colon (:) prefix to the file name. Embedded transforms are not cached separately on the client computer, because Windows Installer can always obtain...

R-Vijay | 05 Oct 2007 | 0 comments

When you are logged on as a standard user and you run a Microsoft Installer (MSI) package, you may receive error messages similar to the following:

1913, Could not update the file... Verify that the file exists and that you we access it.
1321 The Installer has insufficient privileges to modify this file: filename
1401 Could not create key: registry key

Other error messages may occur, depending on whether the change was made in the registry or the file system, but the error message usually reports a lack of privileges on the part of the user or service to perform an action relating to the installation of the software.

When you try to install Microsoft Office XP Service Pack 3 (SP-3), you may receive the following error message, where path\filename indicates the CD-ROM drive letter and the path of a file that is located on the Office CD:

The Installer has insufficient privileges to modify this file: path\filename
For example, you may...

R-Vijay | 05 Oct 2007 | 0 comments

If your application uses special file extensions, you might want to register them so that the application gets started when the icon associated with the file gets double-clicked.

There are special tables for this in the MSI structure (Extension and ProgId). The contents of these tables are used for advertising. You can also make your own registry entries to create application-to-file-extension relations. This example shows how to register the .dvi extensions to be opened with the yap.exe program.

Link the extension .dvi to the DVI.Document class:

Key:   HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes\.dvi
Value: <default> = "DVI.Document"

Describe the DVI.Document class:

Key:   HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes\DVI.Document
Value: <default> = "DVI Document"

Select Icon #0 from yap.exe which is in the MSI:

Key:   HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes\DVI.Document\DefaultIcon
Value: <default> = "[!yap.exe],0"

How to open the .dvi file if it is...