Video Screencast Help
Information Unleashed
Showing posts tagged with Data Breach
Showing posts in English
MatthewEllard | 12 Dec 2012 | 0 comments

This is part of a four-part series on intellectual property. Other posts in the series may be found at Part one, Part two, Part three.

To conclude our series of blogs on the value of information and IP, we’re going to look at the ways in which information and IP – which has become so valuable to businesses – can be protected.

As the flow of information has shifted beyond the data centre, information management is more important than ever. To minimise information sprawl and its effects on the organisation, businesses can follow a few simple steps:

  • Focus on the information, not the device...
MatthewEllard | 09 Dec 2012 | 0 comments

This is part of a four-part series on intellectual property. Other posts in the series may be found at Part one, Part twoPart four.

In our series of blogs about the value of ideas and IP, we have covered the vital need to protect information and also the instances when protection is not appropriate – either because it hampers business processes or because the data has become old and therefore worthless.

What has become clear is that not all information is equal in value. Some is of very high value while other data can actually represent a cost to a business – either because it has to be stored and protected...

MatthewEllard | 04 Dec 2012 | 0 comments

This is part of a four-part series on intellectual property. Other posts in the series may be found at Part one, Part three, Part four.

In my last post discussing the value of an idea, it was argued that more attention needs to paid to understanding the value of intangible assets – information saved as digital records. A retailer wouldn’t leave its stock in an unlocked warehouse so why would – for example – an industrial designer leave plans and client details open to competitors via an unsecured USB drive or unencrypted email message?

While there are some simple...

MatthewEllard | 02 Dec 2012 | 0 comments

This is part of a four-part series on intellectual property. Other posts in the series may be found at Part two, Part three, Part four.

We live in a knowledge-based economy – where ideas are money. In fact, according to the Intellectual Property Office, the UK design industry alone is worth over £15bn a year to the nation’s coffers.

As a result, it has never been more vital for industry and individuals to protect the fruits of their intellectual labour. This includes customer information, financial or legal records, designs, written articles and records, or any number of other different types of explicit, recorded...

Symantec Corp. | 20 Nov 2012 | 0 comments

By Sanjay Sawhney, Senior Director of Research at Symantec Research Labs

The technology landscape is rapidly changing into a more mobile and cloud-based world.  And in this world, the end user and servers (services provided to the end user) are ‘virtual’ or decoupled from devices, physical machines and networks.

However, there are a few constants:

  • The user and server have to share a single root of trust with one another (mutual authentication)
  • The data and sharing of the data drives a lot of the end user experience; not the device or the application
  • In this evolving technology landscape, who does what  with any piece of data is the most important aspect of providing security
  • Harnessing the humongous data...
caroline wong | 12 Oct 2012 | 0 comments

When the words “big data” and “security” are used together in a sentence, usually the word “problem” or “concern” is in there too. Security is often thought of as a prohibitor to using big data, since data of all types – including confidential – are being mixed together to generate analytics which can be used for better decision making. But while there are concerns, big data can actually be harnessed to improve security.

The job of the defender is to protect against an infinite number of attacks. However, a defender will always have a limited amount of resources with which to do this. The real job of the security practitioner is to prioritize remediation efforts by risk, so that the limited resources can be focused on addressing the greatest risks to the business.

Most security organizations have anywhere between five and hundreds of different security technologies deployed in their enterprise environments....

Tim_Matthews | 12 Jun 2012 | 1 comment

 

In a recent court case U.S. v. David Nosal, Judge Alex Kozinski ruled that the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), the nation’s anti-hacking law, applies to people accessing data by circumventing technological access barriers, but it does not extend to employees violating their employer’s restrictions on the use of that information. Under the new interpretation, an employee who has valid credentials to access company data and then misuses that data, however inappropriately, cannot be prosecuted under the CFAA. However, an employee who has valid credentials to access a company computer, but hacks into company data for which he does not have authorization can be prosecuted under CFAA.

The reason for the new interpretation, according to the ruling summary, was that using the CFAA to take action against employees that violate use restrictions could lead...

Tim_Matthews | 15 May 2012 | 0 comments

U.S. companies are paying more to notify people impacted by data breaches, according to the 2011 Cost of a Data Breach Study: United States. The average cost to notify victims of breach increased in this year’s study from approximately $510,000 to $560,000. At the same time, the average size of a breach is down 16 percent and the costs associated with the detection and escalation of data breach events declined as well, suggesting that companies may be more efficient in investigating data breaches.

So, if companies are better at detecting breaches and breaches involve fewer records, why are notification costs continuing to creep up?

The...

khaley | 29 Apr 2012 | 0 comments

When it comes to Internet security, organizations shouldn’t feel like it’s only a matter of time before they suffer a catastrophe. But at the same time, it’s important to recognize that there is no single preventive measure that will guarantee safety from all attacks. Unfortunately, there are so many kinds of attacks that it’s difficult for users to know what threats are the most dangerous, and how to stay on top of them, but each can be dealt with individually. Each year Symantec publishes the Internet Security Threat Report to provide users with a better understanding of the threat landscape, and in a sense helps provide an alliance to protect them from being blindsided.

Symantec’s 2011 Internet Security Threat Report reveals that threats are skyrocketing and are...