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Information Unleashed
Showing posts tagged with insider threat
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Tim_Matthews | 13 Mar 2013 | 0 comments

The show floor at RSA was buzzing with discussion of attacks against critical infrastructure and state-sponsored attacks – the words hactivist and A.P.T. were uttered frequently.  But, while cyber-espionage was making headlines from the show, Symantec took the opportunity to survey information security pros on insider issues related to data access and mobility. The findings show that although 76 percent of businesses saw cyberattacks in the past year, increased use of mobile devices is making the insider threat more relevant than ever before.

It should come as no surprise that the top three motivators for the move to mobility are: business drivers, user demand and financial...

RobertHamilton | 06 Feb 2013 | 0 comments

fren·e·my [fren-uh-mee] noun. Someone who is both friend and enemy, a relationship that is both mutually beneficial or dependent while being competitive, fraught with risk.

When it comes to taking your intellectual property (IP), employees are the less obvious player but they can be frenemy #1. In many cases, these trusted employees are moving, sharing and exposing sensitive data in order to do their daily jobs. In other instances, they are deliberately taking confidential information to use at their next employer. It’s not that these employees are inherently malicious – often they just don’t know it is wrong to do so.

According to a new Symantec survey...

Rich Dandliker | 11 Jul 2012 | 1 comment

In the constant war for information security between businesses and cybercriminals, we are so focused on the faceless, outside enemy that we often fail to recognize potential double agents within our own ranks. With so many resources devoted to preventing hackers and cybercriminals from getting past our external network defenses, it’s easy to neglect internally based intellectual property (IP) theft.

IP theft is staggeringly costly to the global economy: U.S. businesses alone are losing upwards of $250 billion every year. As it turns out, IP thieves are most often either current or former employees.  We trust most of our employees to do the right thing, but the malicious actions of a single person can jeopardize the health of the business and jobs for everyone.  

A research review by Drs. Eric D. Shaw and...

Tim_Matthews | 12 Jun 2012 | 1 comment

In a recent court case U.S. v. David Nosal, Judge Alex Kozinski ruled that the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), the nation’s anti-hacking law, applies to people accessing data by circumventing technological access barriers, but it does not extend to employees violating their employer’s restrictions on the use of that information. Under the new interpretation, an employee who has valid credentials to access company data and then misuses that data, however inappropriately, cannot be prosecuted under the CFAA. However, an employee who has valid credentials to access a company computer, but hacks into company data for which he does not have authorization can be prosecuted under CFAA.

The reason for the new interpretation, according to the ruling summary, was that using the CFAA to take action against employees that violate use restrictions could lead to...