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Showing posts tagged with dlp
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khaley | 03 Sep 2013 | 0 comments

If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing on the Internet. And it’s not just Silicon Valley startups that feel this way – cybercriminals do, too. In fact, most types of cons and crimes have migrated to the Internet. Nigerian prince scams remain alive and well, finding more willing victims. Robbing banks is now done with a mouse. And in 2012, we saw that kidnapping (called “ransomware,” and in this case holding your computer hostage) finally became viable on the Internet.

At this point, which crimes haven’t gone digital? Well, fortunately technology barriers still remain when it comes to crimes of violence (though some might argue that a DDoS attack comes close), but you might be surprised to learn that blackmail is gaining traction on the Internet.

In February, the Singapore Police sent out a notification warning of a rather tawdry blackmail scam. In essence, female scam artists secretly recorded online sessions with male victims...

Tim_Matthews | 13 Mar 2013 | 0 comments

The show floor at RSA was buzzing with discussion of attacks against critical infrastructure and state-sponsored attacks – the words hactivist and A.P.T. were uttered frequently.  But, while cyber-espionage was making headlines from the show, Symantec took the opportunity to survey information security pros on insider issues related to data access and mobility. The findings show that although 76 percent of businesses saw cyberattacks in the past year, increased use of mobile devices is making the insider threat more relevant than ever before.

It should come as no surprise that the top three motivators for the move to mobility are: business drivers, user demand and financial...

RobertHamilton | 06 Feb 2013 | 0 comments

fren·e·my [fren-uh-mee] noun. Someone who is both friend and enemy, a relationship that is both mutually beneficial or dependent while being competitive, fraught with risk.

When it comes to taking your intellectual property (IP), employees are the less obvious player but they can be frenemy #1. In many cases, these trusted employees are moving, sharing and exposing sensitive data in order to do their daily jobs. In other instances, they are deliberately taking confidential information to use at their next employer. It’s not that these employees are inherently malicious – often they just don’t know it is wrong to do so.

According to a new Symantec survey...