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Showing posts tagged with Symantec Endpoint Encryption - Device Control
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Anand Muralidharan | 14 Oct 2013 10:33:39 GMT

Diwali, also known as the festival of lights, is a much loved five-day long Hindu festival. The festival is enjoyed by many people and lifts the mood and spirit of everyone taking part in the celebrations. This year, the festival of Lights is being celebrated in November and as expected Diwali themed scam emails have started to flow into the Symantec Probe Network.

One scam email we have identified, appears to be from the Reserve Bank of India and claims that the email recipient has been awarded a prize of 4 crore and 70 lac Indian rupees, which equates to 10,700,000 Indian rupees or approximately US$175,000, in a Diwali celebration promotion. To claim the prize, the recipient is asked to send their personal information to a given email address.

The following subject line has...

Ashish Diwakar | 03 Oct 2013 14:11:54 GMT

Spammers are now leveraging news around the Kenya terror attack by targeting users through an email message that claims to contain news on the attack but in fact contains malware. The spam email includes a malicious URL in the body of the message that redirects users to a compromised Web page that downloads W32.Extrat.

When the malware is executed, it may create the following file:

  • %Windir%\installdir\server.exe

This allows the attacker to steal passwords and gain access to sensitive files and information belonging to the user.

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Figure. Screenshot of spam email asking user to download .exe file

The email displays a message to “Click HERE to view & watch” videos and images of the terror attack at the...

Anand Muralidharan | 02 Oct 2013 10:42:56 GMT

The latest news making headlines around the world is about the partial shutdown of the US government, which failed to agree on a new budget. Ever quick to take advantage of a situation, cybercriminals have begun to send various spam messages related to the government shutdown. These spam messages have started flowing into the Symantec Probe Network. We have observed that most of the spam samples encourage users to take advantage of clearance sales on cars and trucks. Clicking the included URL will automatically redirect the user to a website containing a bogus offer.

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Figure 1. US government shutdown themed spam email

In the messages Symantec has observed, the spammers are using a random email header, which may be an attempt to evade antispam filters. Some of the headers used in this latest spam campaign can be easily recognized...

Christopher Mendes | 09 Sep 2013 17:22:41 GMT

Contributor: Binny Kuriakose

Spammers continue to leverage the crisis in Syria for their personal gain. Besides taking advantage of a scam message that claimed to be from The Red Cross, spammers are now taking advantage of emails about the news in Syria. They have snuck in a few malicious messages containing random URLs that entice users to go to a compromised malicious website that hosts obfuscated JavaScript codes that downloads the Trojan, Downloader.Ponik.

When the Trojan is executed, it may create the following files:

  • %TEMP%\[RANDOM CHARACTERS FILE NAME].bat
  • %UserProfile%\Local Settings\Application Data\pny\pnd.exe

The files then inject a malicious executable payload, which may allow the attacker to steal passwords and sensitive...

Christopher Mendes | 19 Aug 2013 19:36:42 GMT

Contributor: Sujay Kulkarni

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The Ashes Test cricket series, one of most popular Test series in cricket, is played between England and Australia. It is played alternately in England and Australia and is the oldest test rivalry between these two sides. Cricket fans are glued to the TV and their online devices to watch this riveting series.

In the current Ashes series England is leading 3-0 and is on the cusp of creating history against Australia—if they beat them hands down in the last test match, which now is a real possibility. However, what is making the rounds is not Scholes, Carrick, or Robin Van Persie, but Captain Cook and his elite squad waiting to steamroll Australia.

This...

Christopher Mendes | 07 Aug 2013 08:17:13 GMT

It may sound strange, but one surefire sign that the economy is on the mend is an increase in stock spam. Yes, stock spam is a bellwether signal of an economic revival and if you want proof, check your email. Scattered in your bulk folder, you may find a myriad of such spam promising you ‘an opportunity of a life time.’ Rearing its ugly head every time there is a hint of an economic recovery, stock spam never misses an opportunity to try and con victims out of their hard-earned cash.

Over the years, stock spam has evolved, honing its method of psychologically hustling a victim into buying a particular stock that will ‘imminently’ be pumped up by some sort of syndicate. Stock spam creates an unwarranted urgency and promises a pot of gold at the end of it all.

Stock spam relies on a strategy called ‘pump and dump,’ where spammers create pseudo hysteria, beckoning victims to invest in penny or sub-penny stocks that would give...

Pavlo Prodanchuk | 25 Jul 2013 08:28:48 GMT

Last month Symantec posted few blogs (here and here) on an increase in spam messages with .pw URLs.

Since then the volume of URLs with .pw domains has considerably decreased. At the beginning of May the peak volume .pw domains accounted for about 50 percent of all spam URLs. Currently, .pw domains account for less than 2 percent for the last seven days.

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Figure 1. .pw TLD appearance in spam messages

The decrease in .pw domains is the result of a close collaboration between Symantec and Directi in reporting and taking down the .pw domains associated with spam.

The latest evidence from the Global Intelligence Network shows that even with such a small presence of...

Pavlo Prodanchuk | 23 Jul 2013 12:41:01 GMT

For the last few months, Symantec has been observing pharmacy related spam attacks where spammers are using the legitimate Google Translate service to avoid anti spam filters. 

Most of the samples received were sent from hijacked email addresses from popular free mail services. 
The majority of the messages’ subject lines were promoting either online pharmacies or well-known  tablets such as Viagra, Cialis and others. Furthermore, in an effort to make the spam immune to filters, several observed subject lines contained randomized non-English characters or words inserted at the beginning or end of the subject line. 

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Figure 1. Sample subject lines

The body of the spam message contains a Google Translate link as well as promotional text explaining the advantages...

Mathew Maniyara | 16 Jul 2013 21:24:37 GMT

Improving effectiveness of phishing bait is always at the top of any phishers’ agenda. They prefer to use bait that reflects enticing subjects in order to catch the attention of as many users as possible. Recently, we have seen phishers moving one step ahead. In addition to having eye-catching bait, they are compelling users to spread the word. In today’s example, phishers used free cell phone airtime as the phishing bait.

The phishing site requested Indian Facebook users to verify their account by entering their login credentials in order to get the fake offer of free cell phone airtime. But phishers, not content with just duping one user and eager to target even more, start off by saying the offer is only valid after posting this same offer on the profile pages of a number of friends. Phishers devised this strategy because obviously receiving messages from friends is more convincing than from unknown sources. The method phishers are using in effect enlists...

Anand Muralidharan | 05 Jul 2013 18:55:54 GMT

The 127th edition of the Wimbledon Championships, and third Grand Slam event of the year, are coming to an end with the final being played July 7. When it comes to major sporting events we can expect large amount of gambling, and spammers take advantage by sending online betting and casino email spam. We have observed the following spam campaign targeting the Wimbledon Championship with a fake betting offer.
 

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Figure. Wimbledon Championship spam
 

Interestingly, in order to trick users the spammers are actually using Antispam Laws to make their spam look legitimate (which we recently blogged about in...