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Storage & Clustering Community Blog
Showing posts tagged with high availability
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phil samg | 20 Mar 2009 | 0 comments

Creating highly available Oracle databases with immediate failover is expensive, though sometimes justifiable. However, organizations whose SLA includes near-minute failover can consider a Veritas Clustered File System (CFS) solution. CFS is an option within Storage Foundation (SF); SF users need a simple license key to turn it on. Application clustering to ensure high availability of databases without Cluster File System results in failover times that become increasingly longer as more disks, volumes, and file systems are added into the configuration. Furthermore, if a file system corruption occurrs, the failover time will be dramatically impacted while the file system recovers.

Cluster File System enables the Veritas Oracle Disk Manager (ODM) interface, providing near raw disk performance with all the benefits of a file system. This not only improves the speed of your data base when running on a file system, it improves failover times by reducing the time it takes for...
Eric.Hennessey | 05 Mar 2009 | 0 comments

Hello from the Storage Foundation/High Availability Technical Product Management team, and welcome to the new Symantec Connect!  In this first VCS blog entry under the new format, we'll take a look at reducing the cost of HA by building larger, more "intelligent" clusters.

When most people think of clustering, they think of a 2-node, active/passive cluster in which a mission-critical application runs on one system (the active node) while a stand-by system (passive node) is ready to take over if something fails on the active node.  This approach works fine in an environment with one or maybe two mission-critical applications, but consider the costs of this approach in an environment with 10 or 15 or 20 mission-critical applications.

To avoid the costs of excessive hardware sparing, an "N+1" approach is often implemented in which "N" represents the number of active nodes and "+1" represents a single spare (idle) server....