Video Screencast Help

Storage and Availability Management

Showing posts tagged with Cluster Server
Showing posts in English
Eric.Hennessey | 03 May 2012 | 1 comment

A funny thing happened the other day when I went to one of my favorite sites to look up a word...I saw the above message, but looking at the redirect URL, it says "failover-namechangedtoprotecttheinnocent.com". Now, far be it from me to be correcting the vocabulary of a site whose stock in trade is word definitions, but in the high availability biz, that is NOT what we mean by "failover". A failover is when you have a service under HA cluster control, and in the event of a failure, that service is relocated to another server in the cluster. In its entirety.

Clearly there was some attempt made at protecting the service, otherwise my browser would have just thrown an error saying the site wasn't available. But it's just as clear that protection wasn't extended to the entire business service. We introduced Virtual Business Services to Veritas Cluster...

Eric.Hennessey | 18 Apr 2012 | 0 comments

I've been blogging over the past couple of weeks under the theme "Everything you think you know about clustering is wrong". It's sort of a tongue-in-cheek theme, but the misconceptions I was trying to dispel are real and held by enough people that I felt they were worth addressing. But now I want to shift gears a little bit.

In my last post, I mentioned how a lot of people can't seem to break out of the late-1990s mindset of 2-node active/passive failover HA:

While large clusters meant we no longer needed two nodes for every critical application, many people's mindsets were still stuck in 1997 and they continued to view HA clustering in a 2-node, active/passive context.

To be sure, that's definitely not the case with all of our customers, especially...

Eric.Hennessey | 13 Apr 2012 | 4 comments

 

A couple days ago, I blogged about the related myths of complexity and unreliability regarding high availability (HA) clustering. Today I want to spend a little time on the myth that clustering is expensive.
 
Early high availability clustering was as simple as it was primitive. Shared  storage was generally limited to two nodes via dual-attached SCSI disks and  communication between nodes typically consisted of each node just pinging the other periodically to check its state. If the standby node decided the active node was dead, it would respond to that failure by firing local copies of the  failed node's startup scripts to restart applications that had been running there.
 
But SAN and NAS technologies which allowed many more nodes to share...
Eric.Hennessey | 10 Apr 2012 | 1 comment

 

In my last post I mentioned a few common misconceptions about HA clustering that I'd be debunking; namely that it's unreliable, complex, and expensive. There are others that we'll get to in later posts, but for this one I want to tackle the myths of unreliability and complexity, since they kind of go hand-in-hand.
 
The vast majority of our customers using Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) for high availability have been using it for quite some time and are completely happy with it. But we do hear from time to time from customers who say they've used HA clustering in the past - either VCS or Brand X - and stopped using it because it "broke". Frankly, this reaction baffles me. As an IT guy who's been in the business for - well, let's just say a long time, OK? - I learned early on that if something...
Eric.Hennessey | 05 Apr 2012 | 0 comments

We're making some pretty big changes in how we deliver high availability and disaster recovery, and to do that, we have to change how we look at HA & DR. But in order to do that, we first need to debunk a few myths about clustering that seem to have crept into a lot of people's heads over the years.

 

This is the first in a series of posts I'll be putting up here at Symantec Connect over the coming week or so in which I'll lay out some common misconceptions of HA clustering and explain why they're wrong. Here's an example of what some people believe about clustering and which I'll refute over the coming days:
  • Clustering is unreliable
  • Clustering is too complex
  • Clustering is expensive
Sure, like any other myth these have their origins in someone's actual experience, but just like the mythology...
Theresa LaVeck | 13 Mar 2012 | 0 comments

Discover the power of the Storage and Availability Track at Symantec Vision 2012. It’s a unique opportunity for storage and server IT professionals to spend time with other users, and spend time with our top technical experts through one-on-one meetings, technical sessions, product deep dives and hands-on labs covering relevant topics like:

  • Multi-tier application recovery
  • Disaster Recovery automation
  • Deduplication and compression for primary storage
  • How your peers are using Storage Foundation High Availability 6.0

In addition, you’ll have the opportunity to meet with our product managers and engineers to learn more about and influence the future direction of our storage and availability offerings. Don't forget to take advantage of the Early Bird discount by March 30, 2012.

Raissa_T | 28 Feb 2012 | 0 comments

If your company is building your own private cloud, you need all the necessary tools to ensure business continuity and reliability of the environment.  There are many challenges and questions including how to leverage your existing infrastructure, choosing which applications to migrate, and how to fully deploy.  In this IDC article, learn how Veritas Cluster Server 6.0 was built to automatically help you build and optimize your private cloud seamlessly.

S_D | 27 Feb 2012 | 0 comments

Veritas Storage Foundation High Availability for Windows Webcast for Best Practices for Disaster Recovery and Fast Failover in virtual and physical Windows environments

With more customers running Microsoft Windows Hyper-V in their data centers, meeting uptime SLA’s as Windows applications like Microsoft Exchange and SQL scale up is critical. It is essential that you have the best high availability, automated disaster recovery plan and a cost effective solution to manage storage in your virtual environment as downtime in your clusters can be expensive from a customer satisfaction perspective and more importantly, lost revenue.

Watch Symantec’s Storage and Availability Management experts Jeffrey Armorer and Lisa Erickson give an overview of the best practices to protect business critical applications running on virtual and physical Windows servers....

Eric.Hennessey | 14 Feb 2012 | 0 comments

 

I was fortunate enough during my many years in the military to have been assigned to fixed-base communications units, meaning it was only on rare occasions that I had to choke down those infamous MRE (meal, ready to eat) rations that the US military hands out to personnel deployed in the field. For those unfamiliar with them, an MRE is a big packet containing a full meal for one, typically with items like corned beef hash, freeze-dried fruit, crackers & jelly, and maybe an oatmeal cookie.
 
When MREs are handed out at meal time, everyone takes a look at what their particular packet contains and the inevitable trading begins: "Anyone wanna trade with me for my corned beef hash?" or "Hey! Did anybody get chicken ala king? I'll give you my tuna with noodles!" In the end, though, everyone just put Tabasco sauce on everything to make it edible, so it didn't matter what they got in the first place.
...
Raissa_T | 16 Jan 2012 | 0 comments

Many organizations believe that they have a solid and ready to execute business continuity plan in case of a disaster.  However, according to a 2010 Forrester survey*, “many organizations have lulled themselves into a false sense of security” when it comes to how they value their preparedness.  The survey also revealed that proper plans of planning, testing, and maintenance are not actively tested as often as they should be.  This lack of preparedness is a costly strategy in terms of revenue, employee productivity, reputation, among  other factors.  Specifically, the survey found that an average recovery took 18.5 hours with 4.8 hours of data loss.  In addition, according to a StorageCraft blog, in 2011, disasters cost $52B versus $10B in 2010.  These numbers clearly indicate that organizations must evaluate their...