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Storage and Availability Management
Showing posts tagged with Storage Foundation
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phil samg | 22 Jul 2009 | 0 comments

Major changes in the health care industry are almost certain as organizations drive toward greater electronic records management (EMR) efficiency and regulatory mandates loom on the horizon. Two counter-trends exist: a need to invest in infrastructure to meet the changes as well as the need to reduce long-term costs in the face of price pressure.

Symantec recently engaged Greg Schulz, Founder and Senior Analyst of Storageio, to examine the file serving requirements of healthcare organizations and the suitability of Storage Foundation Scalable File Server to meet those needs. In his findings, Schulz emphasized flexibility to meet unforeseen needs, performance to serve the large files that medical images create and “pay as you grow” affordability. To read the full report, go to Veritas Storage Foundation Scalable File Server (SFS)...

Jerry Gowen | 09 Jun 2009 | 0 comments

IDC released its quarterly Storage Software Report yesterday, showing the market has experienced its first year-over-year decline in more than five years. And while most companies experienced a decline in revenue, Symantec was the only company that actually broke the trend and demonstrated growth during this same time period -- narrowing EMC’s market share in Overall Storage Software.

Part of Symantec’s success is due to its innovative storage and data protection software portfolio that helps organizations utilize current storage resources and ultimately save money.

The report shows the following about Symantec:

Symantec has narrowed EMC’s overall market share lead in Overall Storage Software (Symantec is number one among pure-play software providers)
Symantec continues to dominate market share in the Data Protection and File System categories over EMC and IBM, among others.
Symantec extends its market share lead over EMC in...

Kimberley | 09 Jun 2009 | 0 comments

Here's a product release notice provided from Symantec Tech Support.

Products: Veritas Storage Foundation and High Availability Solutions 5.0 Release Update 1 (RU1) for SLES 11 Linux
OS Version: SLES 11
General Availability Date: 6/5/2009
Product Description:
The Veritas Storage Foundation 5.0 RU1 release is based on 5.0 MP3 RP2 and includes support for SuSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 11. All issues in RU1 are cumulative since the 5.0 release. However, Veritas Storage Foundation for DB2, Veritas Storage Foundation for Oracle, and Veritas Storage Foundation Cluster File System RAC are not available in the Veritas Storage Foundation 5.0 RU1 release because Oracle and DB2 have not yet provided support for databases on SLES 11. Additionally, there is no support for Xen kernel on SLES11 in the RU1 release.

Veritas Storage Foundation and High Availability Solutions 5.0 RU1 for...

nicole_kim | 29 Apr 2009 | 0 comments

Check out Going from ‘Fat’ to ‘Thin’ Isn’t an Automatic in the Virtual World Either, the latest blog on thin provisioning by DCIG lead analyst Jerome Wendt. He breaks down the various scenarios for when the benefits of thin provisioning are easily realized and when it is not so readily recognized, as there can be issues with deployment and utilization in certain circumstances. He discusses how Veritas Storage Foundation’s SmartMove feature can help larger enterprises maximize their thin provisioning investment.

Jerome Wendt is the President and Lead Analyst of DCIG Inc., an independent storage analyst and consulting firm. Since founding the company in 2006, Mr. Wendt has published extensively in data storage publications and journals covering all facets of storage.

phil samg | 20 Apr 2009 | 0 comments

Data deduplication is another technology that has gained wide acceptance as a tool to streamline the backup process. Deduplication eliminates duplicate data even when such data is unrelated, greatly reducing the data multiplier effect on data.

For example, if a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation is stored on different file servers multiple times, deduplication ensures that only one copy is stored no matter how many full or incremental backups occur. Organizations may consider specialized appliances to provide backup-to-disk and deduplication functions. However, these appliances add complexity to the data center with more devices to manage and actually add capacity to the environment rather than using what already exists more efficiently.

To be continued...

Read Part 1: A State of Neglect
...

phil samg | 14 Apr 2009 | 0 comments

To make better use of storage resources, organizations can leverage storage management technologies. Storage resource management (SRM), for example, enables IT to navigate the storage environment and identify old or non-critical data that can be moved to less expensive storage. These tools can also be used to predict future capacity requirements.

Managing storage without an SRM tool is like going on a journey without a map. Having a clear plan and objective before taking action is the best assurance of rapid progress and success. Storage managers should ask some questions before cost-cutting:

  • What is the average utilization rate?
  • What is the utilization rate by application?
  • Which applications are growing fastest? Slowest?

SRM technology can help companies make an assessment and provide an enterprise-wide view of the storage environment, which helps identify problem areas, consolidation opportunities, and to create a priority...

Rishi Manocha | 02 Apr 2009 | 0 comments

The following services have just been updated. Please find below new functionalities now available to you:

Veritas Installation Assessment Service [VIAS]

  • Combined Notification Center – Users can create user defined ad-hoc or environment specific notifications for new patches, ASL/APM releases, new versions of the HCL and updates to Veritas Operations Services (VOS) from one easy-to-use web application. Both the notification center and VIAS reports now connect directly with Patch Central allowing the applications to synergistically cross-leverage customer data
  • Windows Support (Beta) – Support for the SFWHA “ConfigChecker” application to pre-qualify Windows environments

Find Out More
Link to VIAS

...

phil samg | 20 Mar 2009 | 0 comments

Creating highly available Oracle databases with immediate failover is expensive, though sometimes justifiable. However, organizations whose SLA includes near-minute failover can consider a Veritas Clustered File System (CFS) solution. CFS is an option within Storage Foundation (SF); SF users need a simple license key to turn it on. Application clustering to ensure high availability of databases without Cluster File System results in failover times that become increasingly longer as more disks, volumes, and file systems are added into the configuration. Furthermore, if a file system corruption occurrs, the failover time will be dramatically impacted while the file system recovers.

Cluster File System enables the Veritas Oracle Disk Manager (ODM) interface, providing near raw disk performance with all the benefits of a file system. This not only improves the speed of your data base when running on a file system, it improves failover times by reducing the time it takes for...
phil samg | 12 Mar 2009 | 1 comment

 Even as IT organizations face significant budget pressure, business carries on and continues to drive storage growth. So, how can IT organizations meet organizational needs without buying more storage? Let’s do a little math.

First, two baseline numbers are important. Industry analysts peg average storage utilization at 35% and the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for storage at 50%. We can now apply these two numbers whatever assumption we wish. To make the calculation easy, assume that we have a total capacity of 100 TB with a 35% utilization (35 TB). With a 50% CAGR, we would utilize 52.5 TB (52.5%) and the end of 12 months and 78.75 TB (78.75%) after 24 months. Thus, the “average” organization can survive up to two years without buying another byte of storage, if only they can find a way to utilize what they have. If you know your utilization and CAGR, you can easily apply this calculation yourself to see how long you can survive without...