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Symantec Analyst Relations
Showing posts tagged with General Symantec
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Sarah Whipp | 13 Jun 2012 | 0 comments

 

In my first blog I talked about the importance of having good data that is coherent across teams and departments. While it’s inevitable that groups will choose reporting periods that show them in the best possible light, senior execs need a single view of the truth.

But what about planning? It is easy to create forward projections that are more optimistic than realistic, particularly in the current financial climate. While can be difficult to predict buying behaviours with any certainty, however, it should be more straightforward to present sensible worst-case scenarios. But is it?

A long time ago, when I was an idealistic young marketing exec, I prepared a detailed business plan for one if my managers. He looked it through and threw it back at me. “That's no good,” he said, “I need a better worst case scenario.” In other words, one which wasn’t quite as bad. At the time I thought that was the craziest expression I...

John_Brigden | 12 Jun 2012 | 0 comments

This blog is the first in a regular series of posts that spotlight how you can manage the kaleidoscope of change taking place right now in your organisation.

No matter who I talk with at the moment, be it customers, analysts or press, the message is the same: Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) is the hot topic. Challenges abound and people’s angst is rapidly moving beyond simply the device to the business: companies can only allow business to take place on the device if it is secure. According to the Symantec 2012 State of Mobility Survey of more than 6,000 businesses worldwide, most organisations are now commonly making line-of-business applications...

Peter_E | 04 Jun 2012 | 0 comments

Data is one of our most critical assets, and we’ve all got too much invested in it to lose it. I'd say the same thing to an elderly relative about keeping valuable photos in a biscuit tin, as I would to a large corporation with a broken backup strategy and years of backup data. And, the chances are, I would get much the same response - a combination of agreement and an embarrassed shrug, suggesting the problem is clearly important, but that the same old approach works well enough for now. 

Where corporate backups are concerned, it's not as if people haven't tried to make change. Backup strategies have been around since someone first suggested putting punched cards in a fireproof safe. And these strategies have evolved as well, but a number of very real issues, not least of which include complexity and data growth now demand a new approach. 

Every few years an organization will make it a priority to update backup systems, storage and...

Sarah Whipp | 17 May 2012 | 0 comments

 

We’re hearing a great deal about 'information' in the media at the moment. According to both analysts and the word on the street, businesses have greater access to a broader set of information than ever they did in the past. As one of the main areas of impact, we are told, is in marketing and advertising (LINK: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17764117), I'm clearly going to be interested.

 

Information is the foundation of marketing and business as a whole. And unless you analyse it correctly, any decision you make is based on hope, luck and gut feeling alone.  This has always been true, but as the amount of unstructured information grows, the challenge for companies is ensuring that their departments and teams use a common data set for critical business decisions.

 

Information growth and real time access is a blessing to companies...

Symantec Analyst Relations | 30 Apr 2012 | 0 comments

Symantec’s Internet Security Threat Report showcases the threat landscape in 2011, highlighting that the number of malware attacks increased by 81 percent. Read the report to get the latest on key trends including advanced targeted attacks that are expanding to focus on organizations of all sizes, increased data breaches, and a continued focus on mobile threats by attackers.

Additional resources

Multimedia:

GregDay-SecurityCTO | 24 Apr 2012 | 0 comments

A conversation I sometimes get involved in with customers is, "How should we secure vSphere?" The environment doesn't have to be VMware-based of course, it could be Xen, Microsoft, Red Hat or any other, but the question remains. 

From a technical perspective, the set of risks is reasonably well understood and by and large appropriate mitigations exist. For example each virtual machine, and the network connections between VMs need to be as secure as their physical equivalents. Meanwhile security holes could exist in the hypervisor layer, as with any other software package. Protections such as defence in depth, intrusion detection and prevention, patch management and so on remain much the same as in the traditional, physical world.

However, the net-new of a virtualised environment lies in how VMs are provisioned and managed. It is clearly much easier to deploy a virtual machine...

Jose Iglesias | 06 Apr 2012 | 0 comments

 

Isn't it funny how the human race can be so fickle? A few years ago, everybody - individuals, corporations, governments - was concerned about the future of the planet. To the extent that it coloured many discussions: "What's your green story?" was a pretty standard question for an industry analyst to ask, and public sector organisations were including sustainability criteria on their RFPs.

 

That was, of course, before the small matter of the global financial crisis, which understandably distracted attention from such altruistic aspirations. Current thinking suggests that we are happy to let our children's children worry about their own futures, while we concern ourselves with more pressing challenges such as keeping the business afloat, or putting food on the table.

 

Interestingly enough, the wave of attention about the planet's imminent collapse...

Marie Pettersson | 05 Apr 2012 | 0 comments

Consumerisation is nothing new. When personal computers first arrived (together with office and database software from companies like Lotus, WordPerfect and Microsoft) they enabled people with a bit of money to equip their home offices in much the same way as their workplaces. The key phrase here is, "with a bit of money," as the earliest adopters of home technology were frequently the more senior corporate staff. With a simple floppy disk drive providing the connection between home and work, executives were quickly impressing each other with their database prowess or skill in creating presentations. Roll forward a few decades and technology has become a lot more accessible and affordable.

These days we use the term 'consumerisation' to talk about smartphones and 'apps', use of online collaboration and storage, and indeed, having computers and printers at home that are often more powerful or functional than corporate-supplied kit. The...

D Thomson | 07 Mar 2012 | 0 comments

Over the years, I've seen a fair few maturity models applied to systems managementand IT service delivery, a while back “organic IT”, then “utility computing” and more recently to private cloud computing. In general they allaspire to reach “level 4” within the following model:

 

- 1 - Unstructured or chaotic - a free-for-all in which anything goes

- 2 - Structured - a basic handle on what's going on but still on the back foot

- 3 - Managed - things are properly under control and co-oordinated

- 4 - Dynamic - the kind of agile, responsive management all aspire to

 

Now I don't want to question such models, as they are generally pretty good. However, not many of the organisations I have visited have anything approaching level 4, or if they do, it is in a few isolated areas of the organisation. All the same, IT and business goes on so clearly they must be doing something right....

Symantec Analyst Relations | 01 Mar 2012 | 1 comment

Below you can find all blogs that have been posted on the AR Community site. Please feel free to comment and join the conversation.