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Symantec Analyst Relations
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Symantec Analyst Relations | 23 Jan 2014 | 0 comments

This Blog was originally posted in Security Response.

Could your baby monitor be used to spy on you? Is your television keeping tabs on your viewing habits? Is it possible for your car to be hacked by malicious attackers? Or could a perfectly innocent looking device like a set-top box or Internet router be used as the gateway to gain access to your home computer?

A growing number of devices are becoming the focus of security threats as the Internet of Things (IoT) becomes a reality. What is the Internet of Things? Essentially, we are moving into an era when it isn’t just computers that are connected to the Internet. Household appliances, security systems, home heating and lighting, and even cars are all becoming Internet-enabled. The grand vision is of a world where almost anything can be connected—hence the Internet of Things.

Exciting new developments are in the offing. A...

Symantec Analyst Relations | 22 Jan 2014 | 0 comments

As fans of Formula 1 eagerly await the new season, big changes are coming that will have a major impact on the sport. It’s something that Lotus F1 Team readily acknowledges will be a huge challenge. But they will be ready to take on whatever comes their way, they insist, just as their long-term partner Symantec is also embracing transformation throughout its business.

In fact, Lotus F1 Team sees itself and Symantec as being on something of a parallel journey, as they manage their rapidly altering business landscapes – very different, it might seem, yet driven by a common purpose: to be the best at what they do.

It is Symantec’s ability to achieve that goal, time and again, that has made Lotus F1 Team such a committed consumer and champion of its solutions. But first, back to those big changes in Formula 1. “For next season, the amount of fuel that can be used in a race is limited to 100kg, so none of the cars will have enough to finish the race,” Michael Taylor  ...

James Hanlon | 17 Jan 2014 | 0 comments

FireEye’s recent acquisition of incident response and forensics specialist Mandiant for around $1 billion has been a real high profile eye catcher. The move greatly broadens the FireEye product and services portfolio, of course, although the cost of the acquisition has sparked a few mutterings of ‘overpriced’ amongst the analyst community. That said, several analysts cited Mandiant’s service revenues as a great addition to FireEye and it’s hard to argue with that.

Certainly, Mandiant is a good complement for FireEye, strengthening its security intelligence capability and increasing its detection capability at the endpoint (albeit not its endpoint protection capability), while also providing FireEye with a services arm.

Possible issues? Perhaps around efficient integration & synergies between the two technology platforms, although the two companies have held a relationship since 2012. What is possibly more of concern is the differences between the companies in...

D Thomson | 14 Jan 2014 | 0 comments

Having conducted my entire career in the world of information technology, I (like the majority of my peers) am very used to and inspired by questions that begin with “could we..?”. The technology arena exists, is focused on and is inspired by the art of the possible. We never cease to amaze ourselves with what can be achieved over time as the principles of Moore’s Law deliver us more and more computing power and our imaginations are left to run riot.

30 years ago we marveled at the ability to hand-off complex business process to ERP systems, 20 years ago the internet took hold and we marveled at the prospect of accessing more information than was ever thought possible and 5 years ago the world of mobile communications got “smart” and manufacturers started to deliver powerful computing to the palm of our hands...

Now the “Internet of Things” has appeared and the prospect of “connecting everything” has us IT-types “Imagineering” again (love that word! – thanks Disney)....

Straners | 13 Jan 2014 | 0 comments

As we are all aware, information is expanding at a staggering rate. World data in 2010 was estimated at 1.2 zetabytes, expected to rise to 7.9ZB in 2015 and, in 2020, to 40ZB, with something like 30 billion connected devices in the next few years. Against that backdrop, there is really no way we have either the time or bandwidth (cost) to shift these large lumps of data around. Yet, potentially, they have enormous value to people who want to access them.

In this world of ‘Bigger Data’ – and what is rapidly becoming ‘Even Bigger Data’ – this presents a massive challenge for all of us: how do we supply Data as a Service, while still maintaining control?

Because the reality is that, in these data-driven times, everyone is going to have to consider themselves as a consumer and a provider of Data as a Service, and deal with all of the consequences this brings into play.

In the new world of mega-data, information that would once have been considered beyond...

Giampiero Nanni | 07 Jan 2014 | 0 comments

Smart cities are on the increase worldwide and, especially within Europe, there are many such initiatives being stimulated by the EC and national governments. Local administrators and policy makers are under great pressure to make their cities increasingly competitive, in order to attract businesses, talent and taxpayers – and to comply with sustainable policies, greenhouse gas emission targets and carbon footprint guidelines.

What will they look like? In the main, smart city deployments will be multi-faceted, carried out by a diverse ecosystem of providers in innovative domains, involving state-of-the-art technology, including critical and complex ICT implementations. These deployments can address different components and city systems, such as Intelligent Transportation, Connected Healthcare, Public Safety and Security, Emergency Services, Smart Grid and Smart Metering, Intelligent Buildings, etc.

At the same time, increasing ICT complexity, hyper-connectivity,...

D Thomson | 06 Jan 2014 | 0 comments

Identity management was never easy. The basic need for identity is that of ‘non-repudiation’ - assurance that a person is who they say they are - as used to authenticate and authorise individuals to use IT resources, or enable access to web sites and services.

Things such as a login names, pins and passwords are examples of mechanisms that allow us to establish digital ‘identity’ today. For computer users and system managers, the difficulty has always been keeping tabs on all the different login details, number-generating dongles, and swipe cards and so on. The domain of "identity management" (the umbrella term for tools that help manage multiple identities, across multiple systems) is focused on helping with these issues. 

So far so good, but I’m wondering if these ideas are thrown out f the window by the current trend - the Internet of Things (IoT), which enables a wide variety of devices and physical objects to connect to the Internet. 

For...

Sian John | 02 Jan 2014 | 0 comments

Based on discussions we are having across our customer base, we know that the Internet of Things (IoT) is a growing phenomenon. It’s not particularly new - after all, organisations have been monitoring the state of their buildings and equipment, and managing where things are in the supply chain, for many years now. What’s changing is the range and scale of physical objects that we’re starting to see connected, from air conditioning units to office doors. 

From our perspective of course, we are very interested in what this means in security terms. So, should organisations allow increasing numbers of devices and objects to connect to the Internet, or block all attempts to do so? From our perspective, the answer lies in being aware of the risks of doing so, and acting accordingly. 

As a starting point, we believe the challenges lie in misusing what is likely to mean a major new entry point to the organisation. We already have a major...

Straners | 19 Dec 2013 | 0 comments

Information is – slowly – moving outside the database. And it’s everywhere. Businesses want to get their hands on all the data that really matters, wherever it resides, because that is the strategy that will ensure they stay ahead of the game.

More and more, they are seeing both structured and unstructured data as their life blood, wherever, and in whatever format, that data presents itself. No matter whether it is ‘System centric’ (ie, it’s in the database) or ‘Information centric’ (it’s ‘out there’ somewhere), it has vast potential value, if it is harnessed and employed properly. Hence organisations are working to develop and deploy big data alongside their established business intelligence structure: that is where their future success lies.

The business opportunities that will assure their survival, growth and future well-being are locked within the flood of data that swirls around us. If they can relate details from across all of their digital information assets,...

Straners | 10 Dec 2013 | 0 comments

Few areas of IT seem to be gaining as much attention at the moment as cloud orchestration, as represented by OpenStack and CloudStack, VMWare and the like. The debates in the blogosphere and on social media could suggest nothing short of all-out war as different vendors and groups back one approach or another. 

To understand what's going on, it is best to start with the elephant in the room - Amazon, whose Elastic Compute Cloud(EC2) service (now part of its AWS portfolio) scared the socks off other vendors when it came to market - not least because it offered a fundamentally different approach to computing, compared to traditional, in-house systems. 

The Amazon model is based on the enormous power of virtualisation, which enables processing workloads to be allocated to computer hardware far more dynamically than was possible in the past. This is what gives EC2 its '...