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Showing posts tagged with Certificate Authority (CA)
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FranRosch | 16 Mar 2012 | 2 comments

Yesterday Kaspersky Lab posted on their research blog that they had discovered a Trojan dropper file in the wild. The malicious code, designed to commit click fraud, was signed by a legitimately issued VeriSign code signing certificate. This was a result of private keys being compromised at one of our customers. The code signing certificate used to sign the malicious code was authenticated and issued by VeriSign to a legitimate organization. The certificate has since been revoked, as it appears that the private keys, which were controlled by the customer, have been compromised.

Allow me to emphasize that Symantec takes these situations very seriously. We’re working closely with the customer to resolve their security issue and to ensure that they are taking precautions and applying best practices for private key before we re-issue another code signing certificate to them. Symantec employs the highest levels of stringent authentication for every certificate we issue....

FranRosch | 21 Feb 2012 | 0 comments

We are excited about hosting the CA/Browser Forum meeting this week in Mountain View and have a great set of attendees from the leading browser vendors and Certificate Authorities as well as several other interested third parties.  At Symantec, we believe that the CA/B Forum efforts to improve the SSL ecosystem have become even more important given the breaches and attacks over the past year.  The agenda this week is packed with some important topics including:

  1. Standards for improving the security related to CA operations
  2. Intellectual Property Sharing Policy
  3. Discussion on how we can evolve the CA/B Forum decision making process and how we can include the feedback from external third parties including Relying Parties
  4. Higher Authenticated Code Signing Certificates
  5. Certificate invalidation methods

One other topic sure to be discussed is the role of Domain...

FranRosch | 02 Feb 2012 | 3 comments

News broke recently that Verisign, Inc. reported in their quarterly SEC filings that they had been victims of a security breach in 2010. At this time, Verisign, Inc. has only confirmed that the incident did not impact their DNS business. 

Just as Verisign, Inc. stated that there was no impact to their production environment, I stand behind the following statement that Symantec made in response to media questions regarding the 2010 Verisign, Inc. security breach:

Symantec takes the security and proper functionality of its solutions very seriously.Trust Services (SSL), User Authentication (VIP, PKI, FDS), and other production systems acquired by Symantec were not compromised by the corporate network security breach mentioned in the Verisign, Inc. quarterly filing.

Unfortunately, many people are associating the breach at...

FranRosch | 26 Oct 2011 | 3 comments

There is a distributed denial of service (DDOS) attack making news this week called THC-SSL-DOS, and it’s stirring up some discussion about the renegotiation feature of SSL. Some are saying this is a flaw in SSL. It is not. SSL renegotiation is a feature; not a flaw to be fixed. The attack is primarily another DDOS attack.

A better user experience

Renegotiation is a feature that makes it possible to adjust the parameters of an SSL handshake without requiring an entirely new SSL session. This allows for an improved user experience, a must have for most Ecommerce, media, cloud providers, and SaaS sites.

Here is just one example: a web user visits a web site that is SSL encrypted. After spending some time shopping on that site anonymously the user decides to purchase or log in. Renegotiation will allow the SSL connection with that site to adjust to authenticate the user without requiring a break in the user experience. This way, all the...

FranRosch | 18 Oct 2011 | 0 comments

Some of the files associated with the new W32.Duqu threat were signed with a private key. After intense investigation we concluded that the private key used for signing these Duqu files was stolen from a Symantec customer whose systems appear to have been compromised. The private key was associated with a code signing certificate issued to that customer.

A Stolen Key

We take this very seriously and quickly revoked the customer code signing certificate in question. We have found no evidence of any breach to our systems and our records show that the code signing certificate was issued only after completing our rigorous customer authentication process. Our systems, roots and intermediate CAs were never at risk.

Running the world’s largest commercial cyber-intelligence network, Symantec is constantly monitoring the internet and customer environments in search of...

AllenKelly | 06 Oct 2011 | 0 comments

As you may already know, VeriSign Authentication Services became part of Symantec in August of 2010. Since then, we’ve continued to invest in and enhance your SSL Certificates—adding more value and providing even more protection for your business—while still giving online customers the greatest confidence that your website is secure. Since we became part of Symantec we’ve delivered:

  • Express Renewal and AutoRedeem/AutoPay Renewal Services Learn more

  • Vulnerability Assessment Learn more

  • Symantec Certificate Intelligence Center...

FranRosch | 13 Sep 2011 | 0 comments

The recent DigiNotar and Comodo Certificate Authority (CA) security breaches have once again highlighted the need to create standards for stronger security around SSL business operations and authentication processes.  At Symantec, we believe that the industry needs to work together to develop stronger security policies and procedures in three areas and then implement third party monitoring of adherence to these policies by the CA community.  These three areas are:

1.     CA Infrastructure:  Rigorous and diligent upkeep of CA security infrastructure is critical, components of which include:

·       Specifically-designed hardened facilities and physical security measures to defend against attacks

·       Hardware-based cryptographic signature systems

·       Regular third party...

AllenKelly | 08 Sep 2011 | 0 comments

This is the second part of a two-part series on the proper management of SSL Certificates.

In Part I of this series, we discussed some of the risks and implications of poorly managed SSL Certificates.  When SSL Certificates expire or become compromised, the need to rectify the situation quickly is paramount. Take the example of a recent incident where a Certificate Authority (CA) was compromised. Customers of that CA may want to take appropriate actions quickly to minimize any cascading impact from that security breach. Unfortunately, if the customers do not have a robust SSL Certificate Management System, they may not know their level of threat exposure.

Many organizations recognize the risks and implications of out-of-status SSL certificates....

FranRosch | 07 Sep 2011 | 1 comment

Since my last post, the effects of the recent DigiNotar breach have spread across the security industry. Many media outlets recently shared some of the names of the 531 fraudulent certificates created, including Google, Facebook, Skype, Microsoft, as well as each of the major certificate authorities. A hacker has claimed responsibility for the breach and claims to have breached some other Certificate Authorities as well. GlobalSign has ceased issuing certificates as it investigates whether or not it has been breached. Pundits are questioning the strength of SSL. Then, yesterday a Dutch government agency erroneously made a statement that Thawte had been breached. Although the statement was proven false and quickly...

AllenKelly | 01 Sep 2011 | 0 comments

On August 17th eWeek ran an article that described how improper SSL implementations can leave websites vulnerable to various cyber attacks.  While this story is spot-on, what is equally important to consider is the proper management of SSL Certificates. The mismanagement of SSL Certificates can lead to financial loss and lack of credibility for your organization.

One particular challenge that enterprises face can be having hundreds of SSL Certificates and no proper SSL Certificate management tool. The status of each certificate is usually tracked manually on a spreadsheet or through some other manual mechanism.  Manual mechanisms are prone to human error, and what’s more, data is difficult to track when IT personnel changes.  In addition, it isn’t unheard of for an SSL Certificate to expire in the middle of the...