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  3. W32.Bugbear.B@mm

W32.Bugbear.B@mm

Risk Level 2: Low

Discovered:
June 4, 2003
Updated:
February 13, 2007 12:02:04 PM
Also Known As:
Win32.Bugbear.B [Computer Asso, W32/Bugbear.b@MM [McAfee], PE_BUGBEAR.B [Trend], W32/Bugbear-B [Sophos], I-Worm.Tanatos.b [Kaspersky], W32/Bugbear.B [Panda], Win32/Bugbear.B@mm [RAV]
Type:
Worm, Virus
Systems Affected:
Windows 2000, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows NT, Windows XP
CVE References:
CVE-2001-0154

When W32.Bugbear.B@mm runs, it copies itself to the \Startup folder as a filename, which is composed of a few characters, such as ????.exe, where the question mark symbol (?) represents the letters that the worm chooses.
For example, the worm may copy itself as:
  • C:\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup\Cyye.exe when it runs on a Windows 95/98/Me-based system.
  • C:\Documents and Settings\<current user name>\Start Menu\Programs\Startup\Cti.exe when it runs on a Windows NT/2000/XP-based system.

Mass-mailing routine
When the mass-mailing routine runs, it does the following:
  1. Searches for the email addresses in the current Inbox, as well as in the files with the following extensions:
    • .mmf
    • .nch
    • .mbx
    • .eml
    • .tbb
    • .dbx
    • .ocs

  2. Retrieves the current user's email address and SMTP server from the registry key:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Account Manager\Accounts

  3. Uses its own SMTP engine to send itself to all the email addresses it finds. As part of the routine, the worm spoofs the From: address.

The worm can reply or forward an existing message, or create a new message with one of the following subject lines:
  • Hello!
  • update
  • hmm..
  • Payment notices
  • Just a reminder
  • Correction of errors
  • history screen
  • Announcement
  • various
  • Introduction
  • Interesting...
  • I need help about script!!!
  • Stats
  • Please Help...
  • Report
  • Membership Confirmation
  • Get a FREE gift!
  • Today Only
  • New Contests
  • Lost & Found
  • bad news
  • wow!
  • fantastic
  • click on this!
  • Market Update Report
  • empty account
  • My eBay ads
  • Cows
  • 25 merchants and rising
  • CALL FOR INFORMATION!
  • new reading
  • Sponsors needed
  • SCAM alert!!!
  • Warning!
  • its easy
  • free shipping!
  • News
  • Daily Email Reminder
  • Tools For Your Online Business
  • New bonus in your cash account
  • Your Gift
  • Re:
  • $150 FREE Bonus!
  • Your News Alert
  • Hi!
  • Get 8 FREE issues - no risk!
  • Greets!

For the attachment filename, the worm uses filenames in the My Documents folder location, which have one of the following extensions:
  • .reg
  • .ini
  • .bat
  • .diz
  • .txt
  • .cpp
  • .html
  • .htm
  • .jpeg
  • .jpg
  • .gif
  • .cpl
  • .dll
  • .vxd
  • .sys
  • .com
  • .exe
  • .bmp

Then, the filename is concatenated with one of the following extensions:
  • .scr
  • .pif
  • .exe

In addition, the filename can consist of one of the following words:
  • readme
  • Setup
  • Card
  • Docs
  • news
  • image
  • images
  • pics
  • resume
  • photo
  • video
  • music
  • song
  • data

The content type of the message is matched to the file type, and can be one of the following:
  • text/html
  • text/plain
  • application/octet-stream
  • image/jpeg
  • image/gif

Finally, the email message may be composed with or without using the Incorrect MIME Header Can Cause IE to Execute E-mail Attachment vulnerability to automatically execute on a vulnerable system.


Local and network file infection
The worm will also infect the files on the local and network shares, which match the following filenames. The worm appends itself and is polymorphic.
  • scandskw.exe
  • regedit.exe
  • mplayer.exe
  • hh.exe
  • notepad.exe
  • winhelp.exe
  • Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
  • adobe\acrobat 5.0\reader\acrord32.exe
  • WinRAR\WinRAR.exe
  • Windows Media Player\mplayer2.exe
  • Real\RealPlayer\realplay.exe
  • Outlook Express\msimn.exe
  • Far\Far.exe
  • CuteFTP\cutftp32.exe
  • Adobe\Acrobat 4.0\Reader\AcroRd32.exe
  • ACDSee32\ACDSee32.exe
  • MSN Messenger\msnmsgr.exe
  • WS_FTP\WS_FTP95.exe
  • QuickTime\QuickTimePlayer.exe
  • StreamCast\Morpheus\Morpheus.exe
  • Zone Labs\ZoneAlarm\ZoneAlarm.exe
  • Trillian\Trillian.exe
  • Lavasoft\Ad-aware 6\Ad-aware.exe
  • AIM95\aim.exe
  • Winamp\winamp.exe
  • DAP\DAP.exe
  • ICQ\Icq.exe
  • kazaa\kazaa.exe
  • winzip\winzip32.exe

Network share infection
The worm enumerates all the network shares and computers and attempts to copy itself to those shares. Also, the worm attempts to copy itself to the Windows Startup folder located on remote systems.

The worm does not differentiate between computers and printers. Thus, the worm will inadvertently attempt to queue itself as a print job on network-shared printers.

Keylogger
The worm drops a keylogger as a randomly named DLL in the \Windows\System folder. The file is 5,632 bytes in size and is detected as PWS.Hooker.Trojan. The worm creates additional encrypted files in the Windows and \Windows\System folders with randomly named filenames, and with the extensions .dll or .dat. These files store configuration information and encrypted keystrokes that the keylogger records. Further, the worm will log the text of the foreground window and data stored on the clipboard.

These data files are not malicious and may be deleted.

This key logger data file will be sent to one of the following email addresses every two hours, or when the log file is greater than 25,000 bytes:
  • WXUudeba@mail.com.fr
  • bernhardca@111.com
  • glucarini@email.it
  • sohailam@brain.com.pk
  • tiharco@mail.gr
  • tjtoll@arabia.com
  • lilmoore2@lycos.com
  • oktemh@excite.com
  • tdawn@hawaiicity.com
  • raytje167@freemail.nl
  • ernstdor@online.ie
  • mbednar@emailpinoy.com
  • marko.aid.001@mail.ee
  • ellekot@freemail.lt
  • bleon@personal.ro
  • jackk@biwemail.com
  • newhot@mail.az
  • ioterj@katamail.com
  • ektsr@ureach.com
  • wejzc@student.be
  • rfewr@afreeinternet.com
  • wqsgh@asheville.com
  • john3784@catholic.org
  • iyut@dcemail.com
  • asgsa@thedoghousemail.com

When sending the key log file, the worm first disables auto-dialing through the registry to avoid arousing suspicion if you are currently not connected. Once the worm has completed sending the key log file, the worm restores the original setting.

Bank domains
W32.Bugbear.B@mm has functionality that specifically targets financial institutions. The worm contains a large list (over one thousand) of targeted bank domain names from around the world.

If W32.Bugbear.B@mm determines that the default e-mail address of the local system belongs to a banking company, in addition to sending the above key log file, the worm will also send cached dial-up networking passwords to the creator of the worm.

This information is sent to one of the following email addresses every two hours, or when the log file is greater than 25,000 bytes:
  • ifrbr@canada.com
  • sdorad@juno.com
  • fbnfgh@email.ro
  • eruir@hotpop.com
  • ersdes@truthmail.com
  • eofb2@blazemail.com
  • ioter5@yook.de
  • iuery@myrealbox.com
  • jkfhw@wildemail.com
  • ds2iahf@kukamail.com

Therefore, banking institutions may be considered to be at greater risk.

Process termination
The worm attempts to terminate security product processes that match the following names:
  • ZONEALARM.EXE
  • WFINDV32.EXE
  • WEBSCANX.EXE
  • VSSTAT.EXE
  • VSHWIN32.EXE
  • VSECOMR.EXE
  • VSCAN40.EXE
  • VETTRAY.EXE
  • VET95.EXE
  • TDS2-NT.EXE
  • TDS2-98.EXE
  • TCA.EXE
  • TBSCAN.EXE
  • SWEEP95.EXE
  • SPHINX.EXE
  • SMC.EXE
  • SERV95.EXE
  • SCRSCAN.EXE
  • SCANPM.EXE
  • SCAN95.EXE
  • SCAN32.EXE
  • SAFEWEB.EXE
  • RESCUE.EXE
  • RAV7WIN.EXE
  • RAV7.EXE
  • PERSFW.EXE
  • PCFWALLICON.EXE
  • PCCWIN98.EXE
  • PAVW.EXE
  • PAVSCHED.EXE
  • PAVCL.EXE
  • PADMIN.EOUTPOST.EXE
  • NVC95.EXE
  • NUPGRADE.EXE
  • NORMIST.EXE
  • NMAIN.EXE
  • NISUM.EXE
  • NAVWNT.EXE
  • NAVW32.EXE
  • NAVNT.EXE
  • NAVLU32.EXE
  • NAVAPW32.EXE
  • N32SCANW.EXE
  • MPFTRAY.EXE
  • MOOLIVE.EXE
  • LUALL.EXE
  • LOOKOUT.EXE
  • LOCKDOWN2000.EXE
  • JEDI.EXE
  • IOMON98.EXE
  • IFACE.EXE
  • ICSUPPNT.EXE
  • ICSUPP95.EXE
  • ICMON.EXE
  • ICLOADNT.EXE
  • ICLOAD95.EXE
  • IBMAVSP.EXE
  • IBMASN.EXE
  • IAMSERV.EXE
  • IAMAPP.EXE
  • FRW.EXE
  • FPROT.EXE
  • FP-WIN.EXE
  • FINDVIRU.EXE
  • F-STOPW.EXE
  • F-PROT95.EXE
  • F-PROT.EXE
  • F-AGNT95.EXE
  • ESPWATCH.EXE
  • ESAFE.EXE
  • ECENGINE.EXE
  • DVP95_0.EXE
  • DVP95.EXE
  • CLEANER3.EXE
  • CLEANER.EXE
  • CLAW95CF.EXE
  • CLAW95.EXE
  • CFINET32.EXE
  • CFINET.EXE
  • CFIAUDIT.EXE
  • CFIADMIN.EXE
  • BLACKICE.EXE
  • BLACKD.EXE
  • AVWUPD32.EXE
  • AVWIN95.EXE
  • AVSCHED32.EXE
  • AVPUPD.EXE
  • AVPTC32.EXE
  • AVPM.EXE
  • AVPDOS32.EXE
  • AVPCC.EXE
  • AVP32.EXE
  • AVP.EXE
  • AVNT.EXE
  • AVKSERV.EXE
  • AVGCTRL.EXE
  • AVE32.EXE
  • AVCONSOL.EXE
  • AUTODOWN.EXE
  • APVXDWIN.EXE
  • ANTI-TROJAN.EXE
  • ACKWIN32.EXE
  • _AVPM.EXE
  • _AVPCC.EXE
  • _AVP32.EXE

Backdoor routine
The worm also opens a listening port on port 1080. The worm's creator can connect to this port and perform the following actions:
  • Delete files.
  • Terminate processes.
  • List processes and deliver the list to the worm's creator.
  • Copy files.
  • Start processes.
  • List files and deliver the list to the worm's creator.
  • Deliver intercepted keystrokes to the worm's creator in an encrypted form. This action could release confidential information typed on a computer (passwords, login details, and so on).
  • Deliver the system information to the worm's creator in the following form:
    • User: <user name>
    • Processor: <type of processor used>
    • Windows version: <Windows version, build number>
    • Memory information: <Memory available, and so on>
    • Local drives, their types (for example, fixed/removable/RAM disk/CD-ROM/remote), as well as their physical characteristics.
  • List the network resources and their types and deliver the list to the worm's creator.

Symantec Gateway Security
On June 6, 2003, Symantec released an update for Symantec Gateway Security, via LiveUpdate.

Intruder Alert
On June 5, 2003, Symantec released Intruder Alert 3.5/3.6 Integration Policy for NetProwler 3.5x SU26.

NetProwler
On June 5, 2003, Symantec released NetProwler 3.5.1 Security Update 26, which includes a detection for W32.Bugbear.B@mm.

Symantec ManHunt
To specifically detect this threat as W32.Bugbear.B@mm, Symantec recommends that you use a Symantec ManHunt product to activate the HYBRID MODE function and apply the following custom rules.

NOTE: Each signature should be on a single line. It has been broken up for the purposes of formatting on the Web site.

*******************start file********************

alert tcp any any -> any 25 (msg:"BugBear B SMTP Worm Propagation"; content:"CwEGAAAgAQAAEAAAAOAGACABCAAA8AYAABAIAAAAQAAAEAAAAAIAAAQAAAAA";)

alert tcp any any -> any 139 (msg:"BugBear B Network Worm Propagation"; content:"|0B010600002001000010000000E006002001080000F006000010080000004000001000000002
000004000000000000000400000000000000002008000010000000000000020000000000100000100000
000010000010000000000000100000000000000000000000001008006401000000000000000000000000
0000000000000000000000000000641108000C|"; content:"|555058300000000000E0060000100000|";)

alert tcp any any -> any 445 (msg:"BugBear B Network Worm Propagation"; content:"|0B010600002001000010000000E006002001080000F006000010080000004000001000000002
000004000000000000000400000000000000002008000010000000000000020000000000100000100000
000010000010000000000000100000000000000000000000001008006401000000000000000000000000
0000000000000000000000000000641108000C|"; content:"|555058300000000000E0060000100000|";)

*************EOF*********************

These signatures will trigger on propagation of the worm during a network infection and over SMTP. For more information on how to create custom signatures, refer to "Symantec ManHunt Administrative Guide: Appendix A Custom Signatures for HYBRID Mode."

Further, the Symantec ManHunt Protocol Anomaly currently detects the Backdoor activity associated with W32.Bugbear.B@mm as "SOCKS Malformed Data." To specifically detect this Backdoor activity as W32.Bugbear.B@mm, Symantec recommends that you also apply the following custom rules.

NOTE: Use discretion when applying these Backdoor signatures, as they may be prone to false positives.

*******************start file********************

alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|p"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|e"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|f"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|s"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|c"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|o"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|k"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|d"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|r"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|h"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|i"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|z"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|y"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
alert tcp any any -> any 1080 (msg: "BugBear B Backdoor Attack"; content: "|3b|t"; offset: 20; depth: 2; dsize:>21; )
*************EOF*********************

Recommendations

Symantec Security Response encourages all users and administrators to adhere to the following basic security "best practices":

  • Use a firewall to block all incoming connections from the Internet to services that should not be publicly available. By default, you should deny all incoming connections and only allow services you explicitly want to offer to the outside world.
  • Enforce a password policy. Complex passwords make it difficult to crack password files on compromised computers. This helps to prevent or limit damage when a computer is compromised.
  • Ensure that programs and users of the computer use the lowest level of privileges necessary to complete a task. When prompted for a root or UAC password, ensure that the program asking for administration-level access is a legitimate application.
  • Disable AutoPlay to prevent the automatic launching of executable files on network and removable drives, and disconnect the drives when not required. If write access is not required, enable read-only mode if the option is available.
  • Turn off file sharing if not needed. If file sharing is required, use ACLs and password protection to limit access. Disable anonymous access to shared folders. Grant access only to user accounts with strong passwords to folders that must be shared.
  • Turn off and remove unnecessary services. By default, many operating systems install auxiliary services that are not critical. These services are avenues of attack. If they are removed, threats have less avenues of attack.
  • If a threat exploits one or more network services, disable, or block access to, those services until a patch is applied.
  • Always keep your patch levels up-to-date, especially on computers that host public services and are accessible through the firewall, such as HTTP, FTP, mail, and DNS services.
  • Configure your email server to block or remove email that contains file attachments that are commonly used to spread threats, such as .vbs, .bat, .exe, .pif and .scr files.
  • Isolate compromised computers quickly to prevent threats from spreading further. Perform a forensic analysis and restore the computers using trusted media.
  • Train employees not to open attachments unless they are expecting them. Also, do not execute software that is downloaded from the Internet unless it has been scanned for viruses. Simply visiting a compromised Web site can cause infection if certain browser vulnerabilities are not patched.
  • If Bluetooth is not required for mobile devices, it should be turned off. If you require its use, ensure that the device's visibility is set to "Hidden" so that it cannot be scanned by other Bluetooth devices. If device pairing must be used, ensure that all devices are set to "Unauthorized", requiring authorization for each connection request. Do not accept applications that are unsigned or sent from unknown sources.
  • For further information on the terms used in this document, please refer to the Security Response glossary.
Writeup By: Eric Chien
Summary| Technical Details| Removal

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