Posted: 2 Min ReadCorporate Responsibility

How Do We Raise a Generation of Digital Citizens?

New Common Sense census looks inside the 21st-century classroom

We’re raising a generation of digital citizens. Digital citizenship skills, like staying cyber safe, knowing about online privacy, and thinking critically and responsibly in the digital age, are critical to a 21st-century education. With the right support, kids can take ownership of their digital lives and have the skills and agency to change their communities for the better. 

With security at the core of Symantec’s business, we partner with leading nonprofits, including Common Sense, to educate parents, schools, and students about safe and ethical online practices. Technology has become an integral part of classroom learning. Students of all ages have access to digital media and devices at school and schools further important conversations about the challenges and opportunities of growing up in a digital world. 

Last week, Common Sense, which provides trustworthy information and education on media and technology to parents and children, released The Common Sense Census: Inside the 21st-Century Classrooma research project funded in part by Symantec. 

Common Sense set out to learn more about the state of the 21st-century classroom by surveying 1,200 K–12 classroom teachers about their experiences and attitudes around educational technology. 

The research looked at digital citizenship, digital tools and their effectiveness for student learning, access to technology for classroom learning, and technology-integration policies. Read below for key census findings and check out this infographic for a quick look at the state of modern classrooms:

  • More than 72 percent of teachers surveyed are teaching at least one type of digital citizenship competency.
  • The most commonly addressed digital citizenship topic areas were digital drama, cyber bullying, and hate speech (taught by 46 percent of teachers), followed by privacy and safety (taught by 44 percent of teachers).
  • Among teachers who used a digital citizenship curriculum, 91 percent said it was effective at helping students make safe, smart, and ethical decisions online.
  • Teachers’ top technology-related concern was that “students lack skills to critically evaluate online information”.
  • 95 percent of teachers surveyed used digital tools in their classroom and 75 percent used 3+ types of digital tools. 
  • Video-streaming services were the most commonly used type of digital tool (used by 58 percent of teachers).
  • 12 percent of teachers reported that home access to technology was a challenge for teacher and students in schools serving lower income students.

The report hopes to shed light on the state of educational technology in U.S. classrooms, with a goal of helping teachers, administrators, and school districts make evidence-based decisions on what is most effective for students.

Like Common Sense, we see a future where every kid is a digital learner, leader, and citizen. You can learn more about our efforts to promote cyber safety on our website.

The report hopes to shed light on the state of educational technology in U.S. classrooms, with a goal of helping teachers, administrators, and school districts make evidence-based decisions on what is most effective for students.

Like Common Sense, we see a future where every kid is a digital learner, leader, and citizen. You can learn more about our efforts to promote cyber safety on our website.

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The Corporate Responsibility team works to create a secure and sustainable future. From employees to nonprofits to environmental experts, hear about the people, passions and powerful technology that come together daily to make the world a better, safer place.

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