Hacktool.Ace

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Updated: February 13, 2007 11:37:25 AM
Type: Hack Tool
Risk Impact: High
File Names: _PRIVATE.ASP,_VTI_INF.ASP
Systems Affected: Linux, Microsoft IIS, UNIX, Windows

Behavior


Hacktool.Ace is an ASP-/VBScript-based threat that allows an attacker to gain full access to the files on a compromised computer. Access is available only when it is present on a system that runs a Web server, supporting ASP processing.

Symptoms


The presence of the files detected as Hacktool.Ace.

Transmission


A hacker commonly drops Hacktool.Ace on a compromised system.

Antivirus Protection Dates

  • Initial Rapid Release version October 02, 2014 revision 022
  • Latest Rapid Release version May 08, 2018 revision 003
  • Initial Daily Certified version May 10, 2004
  • Latest Daily Certified version May 08, 2018 revision 023
  • Initial Weekly Certified release date May 12, 2004

Click here for a more detailed description of Rapid Release and Daily Certified virus definitions.

Updated: February 13, 2007 11:37:25 AM
Type: Hack Tool
Risk Impact: High
File Names: _PRIVATE.ASP,_VTI_INF.ASP
Systems Affected: Linux, Microsoft IIS, UNIX, Windows


When Hacktool.Ace is in the Web tree structure of a system that runs a Web server, which supports ASP processing, an attacker can connect remotely using a predetermined password. The attacker may then perform the following operations on the computer:

  • List the file directory in the server machine
  • Upload files from the attacker
  • Create a new folder
  • Create an MDB file (MS Access database file)
  • Compress an MDB file
  • Manipulate data base, including issuing SQL commands
  • Execute remote commands with CMD.exe
  • Get the status of services
  • Get the information of the web server machine, such as OS version and machine name.

Updated: February 13, 2007 11:37:25 AM
Type: Hack Tool
Risk Impact: High
File Names: _PRIVATE.ASP,_VTI_INF.ASP
Systems Affected: Linux, Microsoft IIS, UNIX, Windows


The following instructions pertain to all current and recent Symantec antivirus products, including the Symantec AntiVirus and Norton AntiVirus product lines.

  1. Disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP).
  2. Update the virus definitions.
  3. Run a full system scan and delete all the files detected as Hacktool.Ace.

For specific details on each of these steps, read the following instructions.

1. To disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP)
If you are running Windows Me or Windows XP, we recommend that you temporarily turn off System Restore. Windows Me/XP uses this feature, which is enabled by default, to restore the files on your computer in case they become damaged. If a virus, worm, or Trojan infects a computer, System Restore may back up the virus, worm, or Trojan on the computer.

Windows prevents outside programs, including antivirus programs, from modifying System Restore. Therefore, antivirus programs or tools cannot remove threats in the System Restore folder. As a result, System Restore has the potential of restoring an infected file on your computer, even after you have cleaned the infected files from all the other locations.

Also, a virus scan may detect a threat in the System Restore folder even though you have removed the threat.

For instructions on how to turn off System Restore, read your Windows documentation, or one of the following articles:

Note: When you are completely finished with the removal procedure and are satisfied that the threat has been removed, re-enable System Restore by following the instructions in the aforementioned documents.

For additional information, and an alternative to disabling Windows Me System Restore, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article, "Antivirus Tools Cannot Clean Infected Files in the _Restore Folder ," Article ID: Q263455.

2. To update the virus definitions
Symantec Security Response fully tests all the virus definitions for quality assurance before they are posted to our servers. There are two ways to obtain the most recent virus definitions:
  • Running LiveUpdate, which is the easiest way to obtain virus definitions: These virus definitions are posted to the LiveUpdate servers once each week (usually on Wednesdays), unless there is a major virus outbreak. To determine whether definitions for this threat are available by LiveUpdate, refer to the Virus Definitions (LiveUpdate).
  • Downloading the definitions using the Intelligent Updater: The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are posted on U.S. business days (Monday through Friday). You should download the definitions from the Symantec Security Response Web site and manually install them. To determine whether definitions for this threat are available by the Intelligent Updater, refer to the Virus Definitions (Intelligent Updater).

    The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are available: Read "How to update virus definition files using the Intelligent Updater" for detailed instructions.

3. To scan for and delete the infected files
  1. Start your Symantec antivirus program and make sure that it is configured to scan all the files.
  2. Run a full system scan.
  3. If any files are detected as infected with Hacktool.Ace, click Delete.


    Note: If your Symantec antivirus product reports that it cannot delete an infected file, Windows may be using the file. To fix this, run the scan in Safe mode. For instructions, read the document, "How to start the computer in Safe Mode." Once you have restarted in Safe mode, run the scan again.

    When all the infected files have been deleted, restart the computer in Normal mode.