W32.Zotob.J@mm

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Discovered: August 23, 2005
Updated: August 23, 2005 9:55:19 PM
Infection Length: 114,384 bytes
Systems Affected: Windows

W32.Zotob.J@mm is a mass-mailing worm that opens a back door and exploits the Microsoft Windows Plug and Play Buffer Overflow Vulnerability (BID 14513) on TCP port 445.

Antivirus Protection Dates

  • Initial Rapid Release version August 23, 2005
  • Latest Rapid Release version September 28, 2010 revision 054
  • Initial Daily Certified version August 23, 2005
  • Latest Daily Certified version September 28, 2010 revision 036

Click here for a more detailed description of Rapid Release and Daily Certified virus definitions.

Writeup By: John Canavan

Discovered: August 23, 2005
Updated: August 23, 2005 9:55:19 PM
Infection Length: 114,384 bytes
Systems Affected: Windows

When executed, the worm creates the following mutex so that only one copy of the worm runs at one time:
B-O-T-Z-O-R

Then, the worm copies itself as the following file:
%System%\fuck.exe

Next, the worm creates the following registry entries so that it runs every time Windows starts:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"WINDOWS FUCK BY CLASIC" = "fuck.exe"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunServices\"WINDOWS FUCK BY CLASIC" = "fuck.exe"

The worm also modifies the following registry subkey to disable the Windows Firewall:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\SharedAccess\"Start" = "4"

Next, the worm attempts to open a back door by connecting to an IRC server on the irc.unixirc.net domain and joining the channel #ccpower.

This back door allows the remote attacker to perform the following actions on the compromised computer:
Download and execute a file
Steal system information
Scan for vulnerable computers
Transfer files through FTP

The worm also adds the following lines to the hosts file:
Botzor By cLaSic, Bey UnixIRC Crew greetz to all friends in #ccpower. Based On HellBot3
irc.unixirc.net 6667 #ccpower get the src of botzor here!!!
more credit cards,paypals,bank accouts... only in irc.unixirc.net 6667 #ccpower !!!
n127.0.0.1 www.symantec.com
127.0.0.1 securityresponse.symantec.com
127.0.0.1 symantec.com
127.0.0.1 www.sophos.com
127.0.0.1 sophos.com
127.0.0.1 www.mcafee.com
127.0.0.1 mcafee.com
127.0.0.1 liveupdate.symantecliveupdate.com
127.0.0.1 www.viruslist.com
127.0.0.1 viruslist.com
127.0.0.1 viruslist.com
127.0.0.1 f-secure.com
127.0.0.1 www.f-secure.com
127.0.0.1 kaspersky.com
127.0.0.1 kaspersky-labs.com
127.0.0.1 www.avp.com
127.0.0.1 www.kaspersky.com
127.0.0.1 avp.com
127.0.0.1 www.networkassociates.com
127.0.0.1 networkassociates.com
127.0.0.1 www.ca.com
127.0.0.1 ca.com
127.0.0.1 mast.mcafee.com
127.0.0.1 my-etrust.com
127.0.0.1 www.my-etrust.com
127.0.0.1 download.mcafee.com
127.0.0.1 dispatch.mcafee.com
127.0.0.1 secure.nai.com
127.0.0.1 nai.com
127.0.0.1 www.nai.com
127.0.0.1 update.symantec.com
127.0.0.1 updates.symantec.com
127.0.0.1 us.mcafee.com
127.0.0.1 liveupdate.symantec.com
127.0.0.1 customer.symantec.com
127.0.0.1 rads.mcafee.com
127.0.0.1 trendmicro.com
127.0.0.1 pandasoftware.com
127.0.0.1 www.pandasoftware.com
127.0.0.1 www.trendmicro.com
127.0.0.1 www.grisoft.com
127.0.0.1 www.microsoft.com
127.0.0.1 microsoft.com
127.0.0.1 www.virustotal.com
127.0.0.1 virustotal.com
127.0.0.1 www.amazon.com
127.0.0.1 www.amazon.co.uk
127.0.0.1 www.amazon.ca
127.0.0.1 www.amazon.fr
127.0.0.1 www.paypal.com
127.0.0.1 paypal.com
127.0.0.1 moneybookers.com
127.0.0.1 www.moneybookers.com
127.0.0.1 www.ebay.com
127.0.0.1 ebay.com

The worm then attempts to exploit the Microsoft Windows Plug and Play Buffer Overflow Vulnerability (BID 14513), using TCP port 445. If successful, the file 2pac.txt or ii will be created on the target machine. This file contains the FTP script that will download a copy of the worm from the compromised computer, using the previously opened FTP server. This file is saved as haha.exe and then executed. The worm logs the successfully exploited IP addresses in the IRC channel it joined.

The worm gathers email addresses from the Windows Address Book and from the following locations:
%Windir%\Temporary Internet Files
%Userprofile%\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files
%System%

The worm gathers email addresses from files with the following extensions in the %Windir%\Temporary Internet Files folder:
adb
asp
cgi
dbx
htm
html
jsp
php
pl
sht
tbb
txt
wab
xml

The worm will also generate email addresses by appending domain names gathered from the compromised computer to the following list of names:
andrew
brenda
brent
brian
claudia
david
debby
frank
george
helen
james
jerry
jimmy
julie
kevin
linda
maria
michael
peter
robert
sales
sandra
smith
steve

The worm may append the following prefixes to domain names in an attempt
to find Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) servers:
mx.
mail.
smtp.
mx1.
mxs.
mail1.
relay.
ns.
gate.

The worm will not send itself to email addresses that contain any of the following strings:
abuse
admin
administrator
register
secur
service
support
webmaster
accoun
acketst
admin
anyone
arin.
be_loyal:
berkeley
borlan
certific
contact
example
feste
gold-certs
google
hotmail
ibm.com
icrosof
icrosoft
inpris
isc.o
isi.e
kernel
linux
linux
listserv
mit.e
mozilla
mydomai
nobody
nodomai
noone
nothing
ntivi
panda
postmaster
privacy
rating
rfc-ed
ripe.
ruslis
samples
secur
sendmail
service
somebody
someone
sopho
submit
support
tanford.e
the.bat
usenet
utgers.ed
webmaster

The worm then uses its own SMTP engine to send itself to the email addresses that it finds. The email has the following characteristics:

Subject:
One of the following:
*DETECTED* Online User Violation
Important notification
Security Measures
WARNING: Your Services Near to be Closed
You have successfully updated your password
Your Account is Suspended
Your Account is suspended for Security Reasons
Your Password has been updated

Message:
One of the following:
Dear user [USER NAME],
You have successfully updated the password of your [DOMAIN] account.
If you did not authorize this change or if you need assistance with your account, please contact [DOMAIN] customer service at:[DOMAIN]
Please also visit our irc server irc.unixirc.net 6667 #ccpower
Thank you for using [DOMAIN]!
The [DOMAIN] Support Team
+++ Attachment: No Virus (Clean)
+++ [DOMAIN]Antivirus - www. [DOMAIN]

Dear user [USER NAME],
It has come to our attention that your [DOMAIN] User Profile ( x )
records are out of date. For further details see the attached document.
Please also visit our irc server irc.unixirc.net 6667 #ccpower
Thank you for using [DOMAIN]!
The [DOMAIN] Support Team
+++ Attachment: No Virus (Clean)
+++ [DOMAIN] Antivirus - www.[DOMAIN]

Dear [USER NAME] Member,
We have temporarily suspended your email account [EMAIL ADDRESS].
This might be due to either of the following reasons:
1. A recent change in your personal information (i.e. change of address).
2. Submiting invalid information during the initial sign up process.
3. An innability to accurately verify your selected option of
subscription due to an internal error within our processors.
See the details to reactivate your [EMAIL ADDRESS] account.
Please also visit our irc server irc.unixirc.net 6667 #ccpower
Sincerely,The [DOMAIN] Support Team
+++ Attachment: No Virus (Clean)
+++ [DOMAIN] Antivirus - www.[DOMAIN]

Dear [DOMAIN] Member,
Your e-mail account was used to send a huge amount of unsolicited spam
messages during the recent week. If you could please take 5-10 minutes
out of your online experience and confirm the attached document so you
will not run into any future problems with the online service.
If you choose to ignore our request, you leave us no choice but to cancel
your membership.
Please also visit our irc server irc.unixirc.net 6667 #ccpower
Virtually yours,
The [DOMAIN] Support Team
+++ Attachment: No Virus found
+++ [DOMAIN] Antivirus - www.[DOMAIN]

Where [DOMAIN] is the domain part of the recipient's email address, [USER NAME] is the user name part of the recipient's email address, and [EMAIL] is the
recipient's email address.

Attachment:
One of the following:
Accepted-password
Account-details
Account-password
Account-report
Document.zip
Email-details
Email-password
Important-details
New-password
Password
U[pdated-password

with one of the following extensions:
.DOC
.EXE
.HTM
.PIF
.SCR
.TXT
.ZIP

Writeup By: John Canavan

Discovered: August 23, 2005
Updated: August 23, 2005 9:55:19 PM
Infection Length: 114,384 bytes
Systems Affected: Windows

Removal using the W32.Zotob Removal Tool Removal Tool
Symantec Security Response has developed a removal tool to clean the infections of W32.Zotob.J@mm. Use this removal tool first, as it is the easiest way to remove this threat.

Manual Removal:

The following instructions pertain to all current and recent Symantec antivirus products, including the Symantec AntiVirus and Norton AntiVirus product lines.

  1. Disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP).
  2. Update the virus definitions.
  3. Run a full system scan.
  4. Delete any values added to the registry.
  5. Remove all the entries that the risk added to the hosts file.
  6. Reenable the SharedAccess service (Windows 2000/XP only)

For specific details on each of these steps, read the following instructions.

1. To disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP)
If you are running Windows Me or Windows XP, we recommend that you temporarily turn off System Restore. Windows Me/XP uses this feature, which is enabled by default, to restore the files on your computer in case they become damaged. If a virus, worm, or Trojan infects a computer, System Restore may back up the virus, worm, or Trojan on the computer.

Windows prevents outside programs, including antivirus programs, from modifying System Restore. Therefore, antivirus programs or tools cannot remove threats in the System Restore folder. As a result, System Restore has the potential of restoring an infected file on your computer, even after you have cleaned the infected files from all the other locations.

Also, a virus scan may detect a threat in the System Restore folder even though you have removed the threat.

For instructions on how to turn off System Restore, read your Windows documentation, or one of the following articles:

Note: When you are completely finished with the removal procedure and are satisfied that the threat has been removed, reenable System Restore by following the instructions in the aforementioned documents.

For additional information, and an alternative to disabling Windows Me System Restore, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article: Antivirus Tools Cannot Clean Infected Files in the _Restore Folder (Article ID: Q263455).

2. To update the virus definitions
Symantec Security Response fully tests all the virus definitions for quality assurance before they are posted to our servers. There are two ways to obtain the most recent virus definitions:
  • Running LiveUpdate, which is the easiest way to obtain virus definitions.

    If you use Norton AntiVirus 2006, Symantec AntiVirus Corporate Edition 10.0, or newer products, LiveUpdate definitions are updated daily. These products include newer technology.

    If you use Norton AntiVirus 2005, Symantec AntiVirus Corporate Edition 9.0, or earlier products, LiveUpdate definitions are updated weekly. The exception is major outbreaks, when definitions are updated more often.


  • Downloading the definitions using the Intelligent Updater: The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are posted daily. You should download the definitions from the Symantec Security Response Web site and manually install them.

The latest Intelligent Updater virus definitions can be obtained here: Intelligent Updater virus definitions . For detailed instructions read the document: How to update virus definition files using the Intelligent Updater .

3. To run a full system scan
  1. Start your Symantec antivirus program and make sure that it is configured to scan all the files.

    For Norton AntiVirus consumer products: Read the document: How to configure Norton AntiVirus to scan all files.

    For Symantec AntiVirus Enterprise products: Read the document: How to verify that a Symantec Corporate antivirus product is set to scan all files.


  2. Run a full system scan.
  3. If any files are detected, follow the instructions displayed by your antivirus program.
Important: If you are unable to start your Symantec antivirus product or the product reports that it cannot delete a detected file, you may need to stop the risk from running in order to remove it. To do this, run the scan in Safe mode. For instructions, read the document, How to start the computer in Safe Mode . Once you have restarted in Safe mode, run the scan again.
After the files are deleted, restart the computer in Normal mode and proceed with the next section.

Warning messages may be displayed when the computer is restarted, since the threat may not be fully removed at this point. You can ignore these messages and click OK. These messages will not appear when the computer is restarted after the removal instructions have been fully completed. The messages displayed may be similar to the following:

Title: [FILE PATH]
Message body: Windows cannot find [FILE NAME]. Make sure you typed the name correctly, and then try again. To search for a file, click the Start button, and then click Search.

4. To delete the value from the registry
Important: Symantec strongly recommends that you back up the registry before making any changes to it. Incorrect changes to the registry can result in permanent data loss or corrupted files. Modify the specified subkeys only. For instructions refer to the document: How to make a backup of the Windows registry .
  1. Click Start > Run.
  2. Type regedit
  3. Click OK.

    Note: If the registry editor fails to open the threat may have modified the registry to prevent access to the registry editor. Security Response has developed a tool to resolve this problem. Download and run this tool, and then continue with the removal.
  4. Navigate to and delete the following entries:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"WINDOWS FUCK BY CLASIC" = "fuck.exe"
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunServices\"WINDOWS FUCK BY CLASIC" = "fuck.exe"

  5. Exit the Registry Editor.
5. To remove all the entries that the risk added to the hosts file
  1. Navigate to the following location:

    • Windows 95/98/Me:
      %Windir%
    • Windows NT/2000/XP:
      %Windir%\System32\drivers\etc

      Notes:
    • The location of the hosts file may vary and some computers may not have this file. There may also be multiple copies of this file in different locations. If the file is not located in these folders, search your disk drives for the hosts file, and then complete the following steps for each instance found.
    • %Windir% is a variable that refers to the Windows installation folder. By default, this is C:\Windows (Windows 95/98/Me/XP) or C:\Winnt (Windows NT/2000).

  2. Double-click the hosts file.
  3. If necessary, deselect the "Always use this program to open this program" check box.
  4. Scroll through the list of programs and double-click Notepad.
  5. When the file opens, delete all the entries added by the risk. (See the Technical Details section for a complete list of entries.)
  6. Close Notepad and save your changes when prompted.
6. To reenable the SharedAccess service (Windows 2000/XP only)
The SharedAccess service is responsible for maintaining Internet Connection Sharing and the Windows Firewall/Internet Connection Firewall applications in Windows. (The presence and names of these applications vary depending on the operating system and service pack you are using.) To protect your computer and maintain network functionality, re-enable this service if you are using any of these programs.

Windows XP Service Pack 2
If you are running Windows XP with Service Pack 2 and are using the Windows Firewall, the operating system will alert you when the SharedAccess service is stopped, by displaying an alert balloon saying that your Firewall status is unknown. Perform the following steps to ensure that the Windows Firewall is re-enabled:
  1. Click Start > Control Panel.

  2. Double-click the Security Center.

  3. Ensure that the Firewall security essential is marked ON.

    Note: If the Firewall security essential is marked on, your Windows Firewall is on and you do not need to continue with these steps. If the Firewall security essential is not marked on, click the "Recommendations" button.

  4. Under "Recommendations," click Enable Now. A window appears telling you that the Windows Firewall was successfully turned on.

  5. Click Close, and then click OK.

  6. Close the Security Center.

Windows 2000 or Windows XP Service Pack 1 or earlier
Complete the following steps to re-enable the SharedAccess service:
  1. Click Start > Run.

  2. Type services.msc

    Then click OK.

  3. Do one of the following:

    • Windows 2000: Under the Name column, locate the "Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)" service and double-click it.
    • Windows XP: Under the Named column, locate the "Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) / Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)" service and double-click it.

  4. Under "Startup Type:", select "Automatic" from the drop-down menu.

  5. Under "Service Status:", click the Start button.

  6. Once the service has completed starting, click OK.

  7. Close the Services window.

Writeup By: John Canavan