W32.Fujacks.E

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Discovered: January 05, 2007
Updated: January 06, 2007 12:26:45 AM
Also Known As: PE_FUJACKS.AB-O [Trend], W32/Fujacks-K [Sophos], W32/Fujacks-AC [Sophos], W32/Fujacks-AE [Sophos], W32/Fujacks-AK [Sophos]
Type: Worm
Systems Affected: Windows

W32.Fujacks.E is a worm that spreads by copying itself to network shares protected by weak passwords. It also copies itself to the root drive of all partitions and infects all .exe files found on the local computer. The worm ends some security-related processes and services.

Antivirus Protection Dates

  • Initial Rapid Release version January 06, 2007
  • Latest Rapid Release version June 16, 2018 revision 004
  • Initial Daily Certified version January 06, 2007
  • Latest Daily Certified version June 17, 2018 revision 001
  • Initial Weekly Certified release date January 10, 2007

Click here for a more detailed description of Rapid Release and Daily Certified virus definitions.

Writeup By: Piotr Krysiuk

Discovered: January 05, 2007
Updated: January 06, 2007 12:26:45 AM
Also Known As: PE_FUJACKS.AB-O [Trend], W32/Fujacks-K [Sophos], W32/Fujacks-AC [Sophos], W32/Fujacks-AE [Sophos], W32/Fujacks-AK [Sophos]
Type: Worm
Systems Affected: Windows

W32.Fujacks.E is a worm that spreads by copying itself to network shares protected by weak passwords. It also copies itself to the root drive of all partitions and infects all .exe files found on the local computer. The worm ends some security-related processes and services.

When the worm executes, it performs the following actions:

The worm copies itself as the following files:
[DRIVE LETTER]\setup.exe
[NETWORK DRIVE LETTER]\GameSetup.exe
%System%\Drivers\spoclsv.exe

The worm creates the following file to execute [DRIVE LETTER]\setup.exe:
[DRIVE LETTER]\autorun.inf

The worm drops the following file in all the folders scanned
Desktop_.ini

Note: The file is non-malicious and serves as an infection marker.

The worm then creates the following registry entry so that it runs every time Windows starts:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"svcshare"="%System%\Drivers\spoclsv.exe"

The worm modifies the following registry entry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced\Folder\Hidden\Shawall\"CheckedValue" = "0"

The worm may delete some registry entries containing the following strings:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"kav"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"KAVPersonal50"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"KvMonXP"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"McAfeeUpdaterUI"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
\"Network Associates Error Reporting Service"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"RavTask"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"ShStatEXE"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"yassistse"
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"YLive.exe"

It then uses a series of net share commands to close any local shared folders found.

The worm uses the following password list in attempt to copy itself to available network shares:
000000
007
110
111
1111
111111
11111111
121212
123
123123
1234
12345
123456
1234567
12345678
123456789
1234qwer
123abc
123asd
123qwe
1313
2002
2003
2112
2600
5150
520
5201314
54321
654321
6969
7777
88888888
901100
aaa
abc
abc123
abcd
admin
admin
admin$
admin$
admin123
administrator
Administrator
alpha
asdf
baseball
ccc
computer
database
enable
fish
foobar
god
godblessyou
golf
Guest
harley
home
ihavenopass
letmein
login
Login
love
mustang
mypass
mypass123
mypc
mypc123
owner
pass
passwd
password
pat
patrick
pussy
pw123
pwd
qq520
qwer
qwerty
Root
root
secret
server
sex
shadow
super
sybase
temp
temp123
test
test123
win
xxx
yxcv
zxcv

It also ends all processes in windows that contain the following strings in the title:
esteem procs
Symantec AntiVirus
System Safety Monitor
System Repair Engineer
VirusScan
Winsock Expert
Wrapped gift Killer
[CHINESE CHARACTERS]

The worm ends the following processes:
CCenter.exe
FrogAgent.exe
KRegEx.exe
KVCenter.kxp
KvMonXP.kxp
KVSrvXP.exe
KVXP.kxp
Logo1_.exe
Logo_1.exe
Mcshield.exe
naPrdMgr.exe
Rav.exe
Ravmon.exe
Ravmond.exe
RavmonD.exe
RavStub.exe
RavTask.exe
Rundl123.exe
scan32.exe
TBMon.exe
TrojDie.kxp
UIHost.exe
UpdaterUI.exe
VsTskMgr.exe

The worm may end the following services, some of which may be security-related:
AVP
ccEvtMgr
ccProxy
ccSetMgr
FireSvc
kavsvc
KPfwSvc
KVSrvXP
KVWSC
McAfeeFramework
McShield
McTaskManager
MskService
navapsvc
NPFMntor
RsCCenter
RsRavMon
Schedule
sharedaccess
SNDSrvc
SPBBCSvc
Symantec Core LC
wscsvc

The worm scans both fixed and removable drives starting with drive C: for files with the following extension and deletes them:
.gho

The worm also scans both fixed and removable drives starting with drive C: for files with the following extensionsand infects them:
.com
.exe
.pif
.scr

Finally, the worm scans the compromised computer for files with the following extensions and infects them by adding invisible iframe referencing malicious Web site:
* asp
* aspx
* htm
* html
* jsp
* php

The worm attempts to download and install other threats on the compromised computer. The list of files to be downloaded is obtained from the controlling Web site at the following URL:
[http:]//www.whboy.net/update/wo[REMOVED]

Recommendations

Symantec Security Response encourages all users and administrators to adhere to the following basic security "best practices":

  • Use a firewall to block all incoming connections from the Internet to services that should not be publicly available. By default, you should deny all incoming connections and only allow services you explicitly want to offer to the outside world.
  • Enforce a password policy. Complex passwords make it difficult to crack password files on compromised computers. This helps to prevent or limit damage when a computer is compromised.
  • Ensure that programs and users of the computer use the lowest level of privileges necessary to complete a task. When prompted for a root or UAC password, ensure that the program asking for administration-level access is a legitimate application.
  • Disable AutoPlay to prevent the automatic launching of executable files on network and removable drives, and disconnect the drives when not required. If write access is not required, enable read-only mode if the option is available.
  • Turn off file sharing if not needed. If file sharing is required, use ACLs and password protection to limit access. Disable anonymous access to shared folders. Grant access only to user accounts with strong passwords to folders that must be shared.
  • Turn off and remove unnecessary services. By default, many operating systems install auxiliary services that are not critical. These services are avenues of attack. If they are removed, threats have less avenues of attack.
  • If a threat exploits one or more network services, disable, or block access to, those services until a patch is applied.
  • Always keep your patch levels up-to-date, especially on computers that host public services and are accessible through the firewall, such as HTTP, FTP, mail, and DNS services.
  • Configure your email server to block or remove email that contains file attachments that are commonly used to spread threats, such as .vbs, .bat, .exe, .pif and .scr files.
  • Isolate compromised computers quickly to prevent threats from spreading further. Perform a forensic analysis and restore the computers using trusted media.
  • Train employees not to open attachments unless they are expecting them. Also, do not execute software that is downloaded from the Internet unless it has been scanned for viruses. Simply visiting a compromised Web site can cause infection if certain browser vulnerabilities are not patched.
  • If Bluetooth is not required for mobile devices, it should be turned off. If you require its use, ensure that the device's visibility is set to "Hidden" so that it cannot be scanned by other Bluetooth devices. If device pairing must be used, ensure that all devices are set to "Unauthorized", requiring authorization for each connection request. Do not accept applications that are unsigned or sent from unknown sources.
  • For further information on the terms used in this document, please refer to the Security Response glossary.

Writeup By: Piotr Krysiuk