Glossary

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failover

When a node in a cluster becomes unavailable and cluster resources migrate to an available node.

The process of moving services from the active node in a cluster to a passive one.

A standby operation that automatically switches to a standby system if the primary system fails. Failover automatically redirects requests from the failed system to the standby system. For example, you can install multiple Symantec Enforcers and Symantec Policy Managers on different machines to achieve failover. If one of the machines fails, another Policy Manager or Enforcer, which is installed on a separate machine, automatically connects clients to the corporate network. See also database replication.

An automatic or manual backup operation that switches communication from one component to a standby component (a replica security directory or a replica database) if the primary component fails or is shut down for servicing. See also failback.

A backup operation that automatically switches to a standby database, server, or network if the primary system fails or is temporarily shut down for servicing.

The capability to have the service of a failed computer resource made available automatically with little or no interruption. With the Scalable File Server configured as a cluster, the services provided by any failed node are automatically provided by the remainder of functioning nodes.

The process of relocating resources. If one node fails in an MSCS cluster, the cluster server automatically detects the failure and switches cluster resources to another node.

In Storage Foundation for Windows with Dynamic Multipathing (DMP), failover refers to the automatic process where an alternative path to data on a storage array is activated when the current data path fails.

A failover occurs when a service group faults and is migrated to another system.

Failover is a term associated with the Veritas Cluster Server environment.

See Primary takeover for a description in the product environment.

The act of moving a service from a failure state back to a running/available state. Services are generally applications running on machines and failover is the process of restarting these applications on a second system when the first has suffered a failure.

The ability to provide continuous availability of service by switching to redundant hardware.

With the Dynamic Multi-pathing (DMP) software, failover refers to the automatic process where an alternative path to data on a storage array is activated when the current data path fails.