Glossary

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worm

A special type of virus. A worm does not attach itself to other programs like a traditional virus, but creates copies of itself, which create even more copies.

A type of computer virus that can replicate itself over a computer network and perform destructive tasks such as using up computer memory resources. Worms do not infect other files as viruses typically do, but instead worms make copies of themselves over and over depleting system resources (hard drive space) or depleting bandwidth (by spreading over shared network resources). See also virus.

A self-replicating virus that does not alter files but resides in active memory and duplicates itself. Most worms are spread as attachments to emails. It is common for worms to be noticed only when their uncontrolled replication consumes system resources, slowing or halting other tasks.

A special type of virus. A worm does not attach itself to other programs like a traditional virus, but creates copies of itself, which create even more copies. See also threat and virus.

Worms replicate themselves from system to system without the use of a host file unlike viruses. A worm is similar to a virus by its design and is considered to be a subclass of a virus. The biggest danger with a worm is its ability to replicate itself on a system. A worm can send out hundreds or thousands of copies of itself to create a devastating effect.

Programs that replicate themselves from system to system without the use of a host file. This technique is in contrast to viruses, which require the spreading of an infected host file. A worm is similar to a virus by its design, and is considered to be a subclass of a virus. The biggest danger with a worm is its ability to replicate itself on a system. A worm can send out hundreds or thousands of copies of itself to create a devastating effect.