1. Symantec/
  2. Security Response/
  3. W32.Elitper.B@mm

W32.Elitper.B@mm

Risk Level 2: Low

Discovered:
March 10, 2005
Updated:
February 13, 2007 12:35:07 PM
Type:
Worm
Systems Affected:
Windows

W32.Elitper.B@mm is a worm that spreads through file-sharing networks and lowers Windows security settings. The worm is written in Microsoft Visual Basic.



Restore Microsoft Word and your Symantec AntiVirus product
It may be necessary to restore the msword.exe and scrblock.dll files that the threat attempts to delete. This may require reinstalling these programs.


Removing entries from the Hosts file
If this threat has modified the Windows Hosts file, there are two ways to remove these entries:
  • Install and run the current version of LiveUpdate. This will remove only the entries that refer to Symantec domains.
  • Manually edit the Hosts file and remove all the entries that the worm added.

To run the current version of LiveUpdate
  1. Click download LiveUpdate.

    Note:
    If you are not reading this Web page on the computer that is getting the error notice, the address for downloading the file is:

    ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/liveupdate/lusetup.exe

    If necessary, you can type this address into the address bar of the problem computer. Changes to the Hosts file will not stop you from getting to this site.

  2. Save the file to the Windows desktop.
  3. Double-click the lusetup.exe icon on the desktop to install LiveUpdate.
  4. Run LiveUpdate.
  5. Did you see the message "LU1860: LiveUpdate has detected a potential security compromise on your computer"?
    • If you did, let LiveUpdate "Remove these entries from the hosts files" (Recommended).
      This should allow LiveUpdate to run.
    • If you did not, that was not the cause of the problem. Return to the Removal section.


To manually edit the Hosts file and remove all the entries that the worm added

Note: The location of the Hosts file may vary and some computers may not have this file. For example, if the file exists in Windows 98, it will usually be in C:\Windows; and it is located in the C:\WINNT\system32\drivers\etc folder in Windows 2000. There may also be multiple copies of this file in different locations.


Follow the instructions for your operating system:
  • Windows 95/98/Me/NT/2000
    1. Click Start, point to Find or Search, and then click Files or Folders.
    2. Make sure that "Look in" is set to (C:) and that "Include subfolders" is checked.
    3. In the "Named" or "Search for..." box, type:

      hosts

    4. Click Find Now or Search Now.
    5. For each Hosts file that you find, right-click the file, and then click Open With.
    6. Deselect the "Always use this program to open this program" check box.
    7. Scroll through the list of programs and double-click Notepad.
    8. When the file opens, delete all the entries in Step 22 of the "Technical Details" section.
    9. Close Notepad and save your changes when prompted.

  • Windows XP
    1. Click Start > Search.
    2. Click All files and folders.
    3. In the "All or part of the file name" box, type:

      hosts

    4. Verify that "Look in" is set to "Local Hard Drives" or to (C:).
    5. Click More advanced options.
    6. Check Search system folders.
    7. Check Search subfolders.
    8. Click Search.
    9. Click Find Now or Search Now.
    10. For each Hosts file that you find, right-click the file, and then click Open With.
    11. Deselect the Always use this program to open this program check box.
    12. Scroll through the list of programs and double-click Notepad.
    13. When the file opens, delete all the entries in Step 22 of the "Technical Details" section.
    14. Close Notepad and save your changes when prompted.



Reversing the changes that were made to the registry
Because the worm modified the registry so that you cannot (or should not) run regedit.exe, rename the Registry Editor as a file and then run that file.
  1. Navigate to the %Windir% folder.

    Note: %Windir% is a variable that refers to the Windows installation folder. By default, this is C:\Windows or C:\Winnt.

  2. Locate the regedit.exe file.

  3. Right-click on regedit.exe, select rename, and rename the file name to rgedt.exe.

  4. Double-click rgedt.exe.

  5. Before continuing, Symantec strongly recommends that you back up the registry before making any changes to it. Incorrect changes to the registry can result in permanent data loss or corrupted files. Modify the specified subkeys only. For instructions, read the document, "How to make a backup of the Windows registry."

  6. Navigate to and select the subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Classes\exefile\shell\open\command

    NOTE: The HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Classes subkey contains many subkey entries that refer to other file extensions. One of these file extensions is .exe. Changing this extension can prevent any files ending with a .exe extension from running. Make sure that you completely browse through this path until you reach the \command subkey.

    Modify the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Classes\exefile\shell\open\command subkey, shown in the following figure:


    <<=== NOTE: Modify this subkey.

  7. In the right pane, double-click the (Default) value.
  8. Delete the current value data, and then type:

    "%1" %*

    That is, type the characters: quote-percent-one-quote-space-percent-asterisk.

    NOTES
    • Under Windows 95/98/Me/NT, the Registry Editor automatically encloses the value within quotation marks. When you click OK, the (Default) value should look exactly like this:

      ""%1" %*"  
    • Under Windows 2000/XP, the additional quotation marks will not appear. When you click OK, the (Default) value should look exactly like this:

      "%1" %*
    • Make sure that you completely delete all the value data in the command subkey before typing the correct data. If you leave a space at the beginning of the entry, any attempt to run the program files will result in the error message, "Windows cannot find .exe." If this occurs, restart the entire process from the beginning of this document and make sure that you completely remove the current value data.

  9. Exit the Registry Editor.

  10. Rename rgedt.exe back to regedit.exe.


Antivirus Protection Dates

  • Initial Rapid Release version March 10, 2005
  • Latest Rapid Release version September 28, 2010 revision 054
  • Initial Daily Certified version March 10, 2005
  • Latest Daily Certified version September 28, 2010 revision 036
  • Initial Weekly Certified release date March 13, 2005
Click here for a more detailed description of Rapid Release and Daily Certified virus definitions.
Writeup By: Candid Wueest

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