1. Symantec/
  2. Security Response/
  3. Trojan.Spyeye


Risk Level 1: Very Low

February 2, 2010
February 3, 2010 3:27:14 PM
Also Known As:
BackDoor-Spyeye [McAfee], Troj/Agent-NEU [Sophos], Troj/Spyeye-B [Sophos], Troj/Agent-NPP [Sophos], Troj/Spyeye-H [Sophos]
Infection Length:
70,144 bytes
Systems Affected:
Windows 2000, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows NT, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Vista, Windows XP
This threat must be manually installed on the computer. It may also be distributed by other means, such as Web Exploit Toolkits.

When the Trojan is executed, it drops the following configuration file, which is a password-protected ZIP archive:

It also drops the following file, which contains a hard-coded password to decrypt the above configuration file:

Next, the Trojan creates the following registry entry so that it executes whenever Windows starts:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\"cleansweep.exe" = "%SystemDrive%\cleansweep.exe\cleansweep.exe"

The Trojan then injects code into any currently running system processes so that it can then perform the following functions:
  • Capture network traffic
  • Send and receive network packets in order to bypass application firewalls

It also provides certain rootkit capabilities, for example it can:
  • Hide its own process on injected processes
  • Hide and prevent access to its own binary code
  • Hide and prevent access to its startup registry entry

The Trojan then steals information from the following Internet browsers:
  • Firefox
  • Internet Explorer
  • Maxthon

It sends the stolen information back to a control server, which is specified in the configuration file.

A remote attacker may also perform the following actions from the control server:
  • Download and execute files
  • Log and report keystrokes
  • Perform certain hidden tasks on the Trojan
Writeup By: Mario Ballano Barcena
Summary| Technical Details| Removal

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